• SA Ngubane
  • JN Zongozzi

  • SA Ngubane & JN Zongozzi ‘Country report: Sudan’ (2021) 9 African Disability Rights Yearbook 254-272
  •  http://doi.org/10.29053/2413-7138/2021/v9a12
  • Download article in PDF

1 Population indicators

1.1 What is the total population of Sudan?

According to the United Nations data Sudan Demographics Profile 2020, Sudan has a total of 43.83 million residents.1 UN estimates the average growth rate to be 2.4 percent over a period of five years.

1.2 Describe the methodology used to obtain the statistical data on the prevalence of disability in Sudan. What criteria are used to determine who falls within the class of persons with disabilities in Sudan?

The Sudan Demographics Profile 2018 was used to obtain data on the prevalence of disability in Sudan. The census questionnaire was used to collect data, this questionnaire had a set of questions meant to obtain information about a household that include types of disability. Types of disability were seeing, hearing, speaking, walking/climbing, learning/concentrating and other disability.2

1.3 What is the total number and percentage of people with disabilities in Sudan?

According to the fifth Sudan Population and Housing Census, 2008, 1 854 985 persons aged 5 years and above were reported to have a disability.3

1.4 What is the total number and percentage of women with disabilities in Sudan?

According to the Disabled Persons and Disability Rates by States: 2008 Population and Housing Census, there are 899 886 women (47.8 per cent) with disabilities in Sudan.

1.5 What is the total number and percentage of children with disabilities in Sudan?

No statistics are available on children with disabilities, the available data shows statistics of persons aged 5 years and above.

1.6 What are the most prevalent forms of disability and/or peculiarities to disability in Sudan?

The most common type of disability in Sudan is mobility impairment, with a prevalence rate of 3 per cent among the population aged 5 and above. The other forms of disabilities with the number of residents are as follows: 4

  • Visual disability; 583 715;
  • Blind: 92 468;
  • Hearing impairment: 244 462;
  • Deaf: 63 034;
  • Speech impairment: 73 328;
  • Limited use of Leg(s): 336 517;
  • Loss of Leg(s): 61 476;
  • Limited Use of Arm(s): 105 989;
  • Mute: 43 825; and
  • Mental disability: 448 451.

2 International obligations

2.1 What is the status of the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD) in Sudan? Did Sudan sign and ratify the CRPD? Provide the date(s).

Sudan signed and ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 30 March 2007 and 24 April 2009 respectively.5

2.2 If Sudan has signed and ratified the CRPD, when was its country report due? Which government department is responsible for submission of the report? Did Sudan submit its report? If so, and if the report has been considered, indicate if there was a domestic effect of this reporting process. If not, what reasons does the relevant government department give for the delay?

The Republic of Sudan ratified the CRPD and its Optional Protocol on 25 April 2009. The committee received the report that was due in 2011, on September 2014. The National Council for Disabilities was restructured in October 2010. It is their principal authority for planning and monitoring disability policies and programmes at the national level and for coordinating the efforts of the state and civil society organisations, including organisations of persons with disabilities.5

2.3 While reporting under various other United Nation’s instruments, or under the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights, or the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, did Sudan also report specifically on the rights of persons with disabilities in its most recent reports? If so, were relevant ‘concluding observations’ adopted? If relevant, were these observations given effect to? Was mention made of disability rights in your state’s UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR)? If so, what was the effect of these observations/recommendations?

Sudan has acceded, ratified or approved many key international and regional instruments on human rights and their additional protocols, in particular the African Charter of Human and Peoples’ Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, the Convention on Rights of the Child, and the United Nations Convention on Persons with Disabilities.6

  • International instruments
UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

Sudan submitted the third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee in 2007. The Committee welcomed the submission of the periodic reports and the written replies to its list of issues (CRC/C/SDN/Q/3-4/Add.1) and appreciated the constructive dialogue with the state party’s multi-sectoral delegation. The areas of concern and recommendations from the latest reports, in relation to persons with disabilities, however, outlined the following: (a) the committee was concerned about the lack of centralised data collection system, which is reflected in the lack of updated, disaggregated data on children with disabilities among others. In this regard, establishment of a comprehensive data collection system to ensure that data, disaggregated, inter alia by age, sex, geographical area and socio-economic background, are systematically collected and analyzed; and (b) the committee was also concerned about the absence of a comprehensive regulatory framework to mainstream disability in town planning. In addition, the exclusion of children with disabilities in social, educational and other settings was noted. As a result, the committee recommended the mainstreaming of the rights of children with disabilities in both legislation and policy across all areas of children rights.7

International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Sudan submitted the initial periodic report on the implementation of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (E/1990/5/Add.41) in September 2000. The committee noted the submission that was prepared was in conformity with the revised guidelines of reporting. The concluding observations of the committee, however, does not make any reference to persons with disabilities.8

  • Regional instruments
African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights

Sudan ratified the African Charter on 18 February 1986. Their 4th and 5th periodic reports on African Charter on Human and People’s Rights were submitted in accordance with article 62 of the Charter, in 2008 and 2012 respectively. Their reports stipulate the following regarding the rights of persons with disabilities in line with the Sudanese legislation: a convict with permanent disability threatening his/her life may be released by cancelling the remaining period of their sentence, except in special cases; article 44(1) of the Constitution spells out the rights of equal access to education for people with disabilities without discrimination; and the report also makes reference to article 12(2) of the Constitution that persons with disabilities should not be deprived the right to engage in any profession or work.9 In its Concluding Observations, the Committee commended Sudan for enacting the 2009 Disabled Persons Act which is intended to contribute to the overall enjoyment of civil, political, economic and social rights of the citizens of Sudan. Nevertheless, the Committee raised concerns that the report does not deal with the rights of older and disabled people. Thus, it was recommended that Sudan should outline how the rights of older and disabled are protected in the next reporting period.10

UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR)

The review of Sudan was held at the 5th meeting on 4 May 2016. The report highlighted certain important issues such as economic empowerment for persons with disabilities. Sudan was encouraged to strengthen state mechanisms related to the care for vulnerable groups such as women, children and persons with disabilities. It was further encouraged to continue implementing the national strategic plan for education focusing specifically on the right to education for vulnerable groups including persons with disabilities. It was also recommended that Sudan should enhance efforts for the effective implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities11.

2.4 Was there any domestic effect on Sudan’s legal system after ratifying the international or regional instruments in 2.2 above? Does the international or regional instrument that has been ratified require Sudan’s legislature to incorporate it into the legal system before the instrument can have force in Sudan’s domestic law? Have Sudan’s courts ever considered this question? If so, cite the case(s).

Sudan has ratified and domesticated most of the international and regional instruments that include the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and its Optional Protocol. In terms of article 4(1)-(2) of the Sudan’s Constitution of 2019:

(1) The Republic of Sudan is an independent, sovereign, democratic, parliamentary, pluralist, decentralized state, where rights and duties are based on citizenship without discrimination due to race, religion, culture, sex, color, gender, social or economic status, political opinion, disability, regional affiliation or any other cause. (2) The state is committed to the respect of human dignity and diversity; and is founded on justice, equality and on the guarantee of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Article 42 of the Constitution states that:

(1) The Bill of Rights is a pact between all the people of Sudan, and between them and their governments at every level. It is in obligation on their part to respect the human rights and fundamental freedoms included in this Charter, and to work to advance them. The Bill of Rights is considered to be the cornerstone of social justice, equality and democracy in Sudan. (2) All rights and freedoms contained in international and regional human rights agreements, pacts, and charters ratified by the Republic of Sudan shall be considered an integral part of this Charter. (3) Legislation shall organize the rights and freedoms contained in this Charter but shall not confiscate them or reduce them. Legislation shall only restrict these freedoms as necessary in a democratic society.

Since the above human right treaties are ratified, they legally oblige Sudan to promote and protect the rights of its people; these rights are not optional but are mandated by international law. Although the Constitution of Sudan makes provisions for courts to uphold these rights, they depend upon pressure by governments and international agencies for implementation as it is failing to promote the rights of most citizens.12

2.5 With reference to 2.3 above, has the United Nation’s CRPD or any other ratified international instrument been domesticated? Provide details.

As per article 42(2) relating to the legal status of treaties in the Sudanese Transitional Constitutional Charter 2019, international or regional human rights treaties that are ratified by Sudan are domesticated and given effect to by enacting legislations that organises the rights and freedoms contained in them.

In particular, the CRPD has been domesticated with the promulgation of the National Persons with Disabilities Act 2017 on 24 February 2017, which is fully consistent with the CRPD and covers the rights enshrined therein. Provisions from the Convention have also been incorporated into other laws: 23 pieces of legislation were identified, 12 of which were examined and brought into line with the provisions of the Convention.13 The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) in particular children with disabilities, was domesticated through the adoption of the Children’s Act 2010. Article 36 of this Act prohibits the employment of children including those with disabilities who are under the age of 14.14

3 Constitution

 

3.1 Does the Constitution of Sudan contain provisions that directly address disability? If so, list the provision, and explain how each provision addresses disability.

Yes, the Sudan Constitution contains provisions that directly address disability.

Article 62(1) provides: ‘ Education is a right for every citizen. The state guarantees access thereto without discrimination on the basis of religion, race, ethnicity, gender or disability’.15

Article 64 provides:

The state guarantees for handicapped [people with disabilities] persons all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Charter, in particular respect for their human dignity. It makes available appropriate education and work for them, and guarantee their full participation in society.16

3.2 Does the Constitution of Sudan contain provisions that indirectly address disability? If so, list the provisions and explain how each provision indirectly addresses disability.

The Constitution of Sudan contains provisions that indirectly address disability with reference to persons with special needs, right to life, life and human dignity, etcetera, in Chapter 14, namely The Bill of Rights and Freedoms. These provisions indirectly address disability in the following ways: article 43 states that:

The State undertakes to protect and strengthen the rights contained in this Charter and to guarantee them for all without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, language, religion, political opinion, social status, or other reason.

Article 44 mentions that ‘[e]very person has a fundamental right to life, dignity, and personal safety, which shall be protected by law. No person may be deprived of life arbitrarily’. 

4 Legislation

4.1 Does Sudan have legislation that directly addresses issues relating to disability? If so, list the legislation and explain how the legislation addresses disability.

Sudan has enacted two laws specifically in favour of persons with disabilities: the National Persons with Disabilities Act 2017, and a Law concerning the Privileges of War concerning Persons with Disabilities of 1998. Sudan’s Constitution of 2019 also makes provision for persons with disabilities. Furthermore, the General Education Act of 1992 provides for equal opportunities in education for persons with disabilities.17 Sudan also established an Advisory Council for Human Rights in Sudan (National Human Rights Commission Act 2008)18 as well as the National Council for Persons with Disabilities.

  • The National Persons with Disabilities Act 2017

This Act replaced the Persons with Disabilities Act of 2009, and the regulations, orders and procedure made thereunder.19 The National Persons with Disabilities Act 2017 provides for the rights, privileges, facilities and exemptions of persons with disabilities and the implementation thereof. It also provides for amongst others: the establishment of the National Council for Persons with Disabilities, formations and supervision of the General Secretariat.20

  • The General Education Act 1992

This Act provides for equal education opportunities for disabled people. Under this Act, all children with disabilities are/were entitled to free education from 2002. 21

  • The National Human Rights Commission Act 2008

This Act provides for the establishment of the Advisory Council for Human Rights in Sudan, which is an advisory unit to the Sudan government. The unit involves various committees including the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The role of this particular Committee is to raise awareness of the rights of disabled people, make recommendations on existing laws and their suitability to persons with disabilities, as well as conduct research relating to disability policies.22

4.2 Does Sudan have legislation that indirectly addresses issues relating to disability? If so, list the legislation and explain how the legislation addresses disability.

According to the Sudanese Transitional Charter 2019, all people are subject to the rule of law.23 Furthermore, article 3 of the Charter provides that ‘rights and duties are based on citizenship without discrimination due to race, religion, culture, sex, color, gender, social or economic status, political opinion, disability, regional affiliation or any other cause’. Thus, we can say that since all people - including persons with disabilities - fall under the rule of law, they are therefore, affected by all general laws that are applicable to the Sudanese citizens.


5 Decisions of courts and tribunals

5.1 Have the courts (or tribunals) in Sudan ever decided on an issue(s) relating to disability? If so, list the cases and provide a summary for each of the cases with the facts, the decision(s) and the reasoning.

Courts and Tribunals play an important role in the promotion and the protection of human rights through rendered judgments. In Sudan, a number of laws, including articles 4, 41 and 62 of the Constitution of 2019 as well as the National Disability Act, promotes participation in society for persons with disabilities. Some cases relating to disability particularly in employment have been reported in literature. The case of Adam Mohamed presented below is an example of how public bodies may be ignoring their obligations under the Constitution, National Disability Act and the Civil Service Act.

  • Adam Mohamed Hamid v National Civil Service Recruitment Board & Ministry of Electricity and Dams24

Adam Mohamed Hamid graduated from the Faculty of Business Administration at the University of Khartoum in 2006. On 27 March 2009, he applied for one of a number of administrative vacancies advertised by the Ministry of Electricity and Dams (the Ministry). His name appeared in the list of shortlisted applicants prepared by the National Civil Service Recruitment Board (the Board). The Ministry and the Board held an exam for all shortlisted applicants, which Mr Hamid passed.

At the subsequent interview, Mr Hamid was subjected to a number of questions focused on his disability. For example, he was asked whether he is able to use a computer with his disabled hand; he replied that he could. When the list of successful applicants was published, Mr Hamid’s name was not included. Mr Hamid concluded that, given the questions he had been asked, his disability could have been one of the factors in the decision not to select him and therefore decided to launch a legal challenge.

On 24 July 2011, Mr Hamid filed a lawsuit before the Constitutional Court against the Board and the Ministry, claiming to have been denied the right to work due to his disability. He based his claim on article 45(1) of the Constitution, which provides that persons with disabilities shall enjoy all the rights and freedoms set out in the Constitution, including, in particular, the right to respect for their human dignity, access to suitable education and employment and full participation in society. Mr Hamid argued that the decision not to appoint him also violated section 24(7) of the National Civil Service Act 2007, which obliges all state bodies to allocate a percentage of not less than 2 per cent of all approved positions to persons with disabilities, taking into consideration the nature and requirements of work and the nature of the disability.

He further argued that the decision violated section 4(2) of the National Disability Act 2009, which obligates the concerned authorities to implement a number of specified rights, privileges, facilities and exemptions, including the right of persons with disabilities to be appointed to jobs in public institutions (section 4(2)(e)) and the right to reasonable accommodation in the work place to respond to the needs of persons with disabilities (section 4(2)(h)).

As of March 2014, the case was pending; the Equal Rights Trust has not been informed of the outcome at the time of publication.

  • Case Law under the National Civil Service Act 2007

In Alsier Mustafa Khalfalah v Civil Service Recruitment Committee of Khartoum State25 the claimant argued that the Civil Service Recruitment Committee of the State of Khartoum had failed to discharge its obligations under the National Civil Service Act 2007. In 2010, the Committee announced a number of vacancies for teachers at the Ministry of General Education. This was followed shortly afterwards by an Order issued by the Governor of the State of Khartoum, also published in newspapers, instructing the Recruitment Committee to ensure that 5 per cent of the vacancies were filled by persons with disabilities who were otherwise qualified and who met the conditions of recruitment. The Recruitment Committee selected 18 persons with disabilities out of 1 050 persons recruited in total. The claimants, who were unsuccessful in their applications, appealed against the decision of the Recruitment Committee to reject their applications despite the fact that persons with disabilities were allotted 5 per cent of vacancies in the Governor’s Order. They argued that the 1.8 per cent of selected candidates with disabilities was far less than the 5 per cent required by the Order.

The claimants’ case was dismissed at first instance and on appeal by the High Court (Administrative Circuit). The High Court upheld the decision of the lower court on the basis that the Governor’s Order contradicted the National Civil Service Act 2007 which only requires a quota of 2 per cent for persons with disabilities. Thus, the defendant was not bound by the 5 per cent quota set out in the Governor’s Order.

Some have argued that the court wrongly interpreted the National Civil Service Act 2007, which states that ‘all units of the states shall allocate not less than 2% of the approved announced vacancies for persons with disabilities’. The 2 per cent figure in the 2007 Act was therefore a minimum and the Governor’s Order was not inconsistent with the Act, but instead an attempt to implement the positive action clause in the Act. Additionally, neither the claimants, nor the court, made reference to article 136 of the Constitution, which concerns inclusiveness in the civil service and, in particular, the requirement, set down in article 136(e) of the ‘application of affirmative action and job training to achieve targets for equitable representation within a specified time frame’. 

6 Policies and programmes

6.1 Does Sudan have policies or programmes that directly address disability? If so, list each policy and explain how the policy addresses disability

Yes, it does.

  • Five-year higher education disability strategy 2018-2022

The Sudanese Council of Ministers approved this strategy aimed at empowering persons with disabilities in higher learning institutions and scientific research institutes in 2018. The purpose of the programme is to allow students with disabilities to qualify, integrate into society and play a role in sustainable development. If properly implemented, the strategy will increase access to education and remove other barriers of learning. 26

  • Social Initiative Programme

This initiative, which was adopted in 2012 and implemented by the Ministry of Welfare and Social Security and its agencies, including the National Council for the Disabled, aims to reduce poverty. This is an extensive programme and includes support to special groups like rural woman and persons with disabilities.27

6.2 Does Sudan have policies or programmes that indirectly address disability? If so, list each policy and explain how the policy addresses disability.
  • National Action Plan for the Protection of Human Rights

This action plan was launched in June 2013, its content, objectives, human and financial resources are aimed at promoting human rights of Sudanese citizens including people with disabilities. This Action Plan is promulgated on the Constitutional and Legal Framework Article 2.

  • Right to life and prohibition of torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment (article 6 & 7)

This is a constitutional right that seeks to protect all citizens’ right to life.

  • Rights of Persons with Special Needs and the Elderly (article 45)

This article provides:

The State shall guarantee to persons with special needs the enjoyment of all the rights and freedoms set out in this Constitution; especially respect for their human dignity, access to suitable education, employment and full participation in society. The elderly shall have the right to the respect of their dignity. The State shall provide them with the necessary care and medical services as shall be regulated by law.

  • Khartoum Public Order Act of 1998, the Trade Union Act of 2010, the Press and Publication Act of 2009 and the Voluntary and Humanitarian Work (Organisation) Act of 2006

These Acts retain provisions that are incompatible with or raise concerns regarding their compatibility with the rights guaranteed under the Covenant, including the right to non-discrimination, the right to form and join trade unions, and the right to health.


7 Disability bodies

7.1 Other than the ordinary courts and tribunals, does Sudan have any official body that specifically addresses violations of the rights of people with disabilities? If so, describe the body, its functions and its powers.

The National Council for Persons with Disabilities that was restructured in October 2010 has the principal authority for planning and monitoring disability policies and programmes at the national level and for coordinating the efforts of the state and civil society organisations, including organisations of persons with disabilities. By so doing, the Council addresses the violations of the policies on rights of people with disability.

7.2 Other than the ordinary courts or tribunals, does Sudan have any official body that though not established to specifically address violations of the rights of persons with disabilities, can nonetheless do so? If so, describe the body, its functions and its powers.

An institution that deals indirectly with persons with disabilities is the National Human Rights Commission that is mandated to promote and protect human rights (including disability rights).

8 National human rights institutions

8.1 Does Sudan have a Human Rights Commission, Ombudsman or Public Protector? If so, does its remit include the promotion and protection of the rights of people with disabilities? If your answer is yes, also indicate whether the Human Rights Commission, Ombudsman or Public Protector has ever addressed issues relating to the rights of persons with disabilities.

According to the National Commission for Human Rights Act 2009, article 9(1), the National Human Rights Commission is mandated with the task to protect and publicise human rights and monitor the implementation of the rights and freedoms contained in the rights and freedoms charter, including the rights of persons with disabilities.

The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) oversees the implementation of Office of the Ombudsman which is also an independent institution established by the Constitution. Functions of the office of the Ombudsman are to prevent and fight against injustice, corruption, offences related to public and private administration. Furthermore, this office conducts sensitisation and public awareness activities in various institutions to urge them to find solutions to complaints from the population, including petitions lodged by persons with disabilities.28

9 Disabled peoples organisations (DPOs) and other civil society organisations

9.1 Does Sudan have organisations that represent and advocate for the rights and welfare of persons with disabilities? If so, list each organisation and describe its activities.

There are various DPOs included in the Action on Disability Development (ADD) international support in Sudan. These include National Union of the Blind, River Nile Union of the Blind, Kassala Union of the Blind, Khartoum Union of the Blind, Nyala Union of the Blind, National Union of the Deaf, Kassala Union of the Deaf , Wad Medani Union of the Deaf , Red Sea Union of the Deaf , Gadarif Union of the Deaf, Khartoum Union of the Deaf, Juba Union of the Deaf, Nyala Union of the Deaf, National Union of the Disabled, Mayo Union of the Disabled, Gash: Aroma Union of the Disabled, and River Nile Union of the Disabled. Other organisations are discussed below:

  • National Council for Persons with Disabilities in Sudan

The NCPD is tasked with designing the Strategic Plan for Persons with Disabilities in Sudan. The strategy they develop will be mainstreamed to all government ministries.29

  • The Organisation of Women with Disabilities in Sudan

OWD includes all women with disabilities regardless of their nature of disability. Their goal is to promote social inclusion of women with disabilities in their communities, share best practices in self-development and strengthen their supportive networks.30

  • Action on Disability and Development (ADD)

ADD is an international organisation that works in Sudan and other countries. Its mandate is to partner with disability activists in Africa and Asia to facilitate access to tools, resources and support in order to facilitate quality and sustainable lives for people with disabilities.31

9.2 In the countries in Sudan’s region (Africa) are DPOs organised/coordinated at national and/or regional level?

While there is some level of coordination between DPOs at the national level. However, there is no umbrella organisation of DPOs. National Council for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) was formed to serve as a civil entity for the national mobilisation of persons with disabilities in Sudan.32 NCPD’s key activity is to ensure that no one is discriminated based on their disability.33 They also promote the right to education and development opportunity for persons with disabilities.

9.3 If Sudan has ratified the CRPD, how has it ensured the involvement of DPOs in the implementation process?

Sudan signed the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2007 and ratified it in 2009. Sudan also ratified but not signed the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Ratifying the protocols allows the government to develop the implementation of CRPD at the local level. This also facilitates alternative decision-making rather than supported decision-making, appropriate care for girls and women with disabilities, forced sexual reproductive health medical interventions, reasonable accommodation, status and use of sign language, and other inclusive approaches towards Sustainable Development Goals.34 Although Sudan has made attempts to involve DPOs in the implementation process through the establishment of the National Council for Persons with Disabilities to coordinate the efforts of the state and civil society organisations, including organisations of persons with disabilities, it appears that on the ground, DPOs do not have a meaningful involvement.

9.4 What types of actions have DPOs themselves taken to ensure that they are fully embedded in the process of implementation?

The National Council of Persons with Disabilities was created by the Constitution of 3 June 2003 as amended to date, determining its responsibilities, organisation and functioning. It is the forum for advocacy and social mobilisation on issues affecting persons with disabilities in order to build their capacity and ensure their participation in national development. The NCPD has been calling for the Minister of Education to curb the discrimination of disabled teachers.

In Sudan, disability activists are also involved in developing the CRPD together with other several active national disabled people’s organisations to promote disability rights. Most organisations are funded by individuals and charity organisations. There is limited governmental funding of disabled people’s organisations. Sudanese disabled people’s organisations claim that a national umbrella organisation/federation to take on the responsibility of coordination between local and national organisations is necessary.35

9.5 What, if any, are the barriers DPOs have faced in engaging with implementation?

In addition to lack of information and limited accessibility, in which DPOs are seldom involved or consulted, the following barriers are also present:

  • Lack of disability related expertise and skills among DPOs;
  • Lack of locally established initiatives;
  • Little knowledge of project management amongst the groups;
  • Paucity of awareness amongst people with disabilities of their rights; hence the dire need to capacitate DPOs on the knowledge of human rights;
  • There is a need for grass roots level-based initiatives on promoting the rights and abilities of people with disabilities; and
  • There is minimal monitoring and evaluation of disability related initiatives in both urban and rural areas.
9.6 Are there specific instances that provide ‘best-practice models’ for ensuring proper involvement 36of DPOs?

The establishment of the National Council of Persons with Disabilities provided the DPOs a platform for advocacy, promotion of the rights of the persons with disabilities and involvement in the formulation and implementation of laws. The presence of the NCPD members at grassroots and national level also offers the civil society organisations, like National Union of the Blind, River Nile Union of the Blind, Kassala Union of the Blind, and Khartoum Union of the Blind an opportunity to collaborate and relate with them at different levels to advocate for the rights of persons with disabilities.

9.7 Are there any specific outcomes regarding successful implementation and/or improved recognition of the rights of persons with disabilities that resulted from the engagement of DPOs in the implementation process?

There are some success stories resulting from the work of the organisation that seeks to ensure recognition of the rights of women and girls with disabilities together with the National Council of Persons with Disabilities. A concrete example is the case of a woman who asked for help to access the University because the Faculty of Education refused her entry, arguing that she could not be a teacher because her disability prevented her from hearing the students. Faced to this situation, the organisation went to the University to solve the problem and woman was allowed to continue studying.37

9.8 Has your research shown areas for capacity building and support (particularly in relation to research) for DPOs with respect to their engagement with the implementation process?

The research has shown that there is a need for capacity building and support for DPOs. See question 9.4 above where areas of potential research are identified.

9.9 Are there recommendations that come out of your research as to how DPOs might be more comprehensively empowered to take a leading role in the implementation processes of international or regional instruments?

The Sudanese Government should ensure the meaningful involvement of DPOs in the designing, planning and implementation of policies and strategies that address persons with disabilities issues. Some strategies including, inter alia, the following can be adopted:

  • Development of implementation strategies to ensure that policies are operationalised;
  • Research capacity building for DPOs so they can evaluate the effectiveness of interventions (No research about us, without us);
  • DPOs should be capacitated on meaningful collaborations and networks;
  • Build capacity to interpret legislation; and
  • Create accessible platforms for DPOs and persons with disabilities in general.
9.10 Are there specific research institutes in the region where Sudan is situated (North Africa) that work on the rights of persons with disabilities and that have facilitated the involvement of DPOs in the process, including in research?

No.

10 Government departments

10.1 Does Sudan have a government department or departments that is/are specifically responsible for promoting and protecting the rights and welfare of persons with disabilities? If so, describe the activities of the department(s).

The Minister of Education and Public Education committed to promote and protect the rights and welfare of persons with disabilities through implementing the inclusive education policy. The Minister of State at the Ministry of Security Social Development committed to supporting projects and issues that aim at improving the livelihood of persons with disabilities in Sudan.

11 Main human rights concerns of people with disabilities

11.1 Contemporary challenges of persons with disabilities in Sudan (for example, in some parts of Africa ritual killing of certain classes of PWDs, such as people with albinism, occurs).

There have not been any reported killings of people with albinism in Sudan. Though the People with Disabilities Council has reported use of derogatory terms about disability, lack of active public and political participation of persons with disabilities, inadequate access to justice and legal assistance, freedom to marry, voting rights and preparation for independent living.38

11.2 Describe the contemporary challenges of persons with disabilities, and the legal responses thereto, and assess the adequacy of these responses to:
  • Adoption of the human rights-based approach to disability

Sudan made noticeable progress by enacting the amended Persons with Disabilities Act of 2017 which replaced the medical approach-based Persons with Disabilities Act of 2009.39 Twenty-three other laws were identified to be aligned with the CRPD. The Medical Insurance Act was studied together with 12 other laws for any human and disability rights violation.40

  • Access to all the rights and freedoms in the Constitution

The Constitution of the Republic of Sudan, article 45 guarantees persons with disabilities all the right and freedoms set out in the Sudanese Constitution; especially respect of their human dignity, access to suitable education, employment and full participation in society.41

11.3 Do people with disabilities have a right to participation in political life (political representation and leadership) in Sudan?

Although the Constitution of Sudan attempts to grant every citizen the right to participate in political life, this right is not fully legalised, practiced or implemented. This was evident when looking at the 2015 elections that were held in which persons with disabilities were not able to fully participate as accessibility was a major obstacle. This was partly because persons with psycho-social disabilities were not able to participate in the process at all because of the legal capacity issue. In the Concluding Observations to Sudan’s report to the CRPD, certain principal areas of concern were identified. These included the omission of psychosocial disability from the definition of disability in national legislation, in particular in the Persons with Disabilities Act of 2017. The committee raised concerns about the exclusion of persons with intellectual and/or psychosocial disabilities from the election process by establishing ‘mental capacity’ as a prerequisite for the right to vote. Furthermore, issues of inaccessible voting environment and lack of capacity of election officials to address the needs of voters with disabilities were raised.

11.4 Are people with disabilities’ socio-economic rights, including the right to health, education and other social services protected and realised in your country?

The Constitution of Sudan, article 19 states: ‘The State shall promote public health and guarantee equal access and free primary health care to all citizens’.42

The Constitution of Sudan, article 12 stipulates that:

The State shall develop policies and strategies to ensure social justice among all people of the Sudan, through ensuring means of livelihood and opportunities of employment. The State shall also encourage mutual assistance, self-help, co-operation and charity. No qualified person shall be denied access to a profession or employment on the basis of disability; persons with special needs and the elderly shall have the right to participate in social, vocational, creative or recreational activities. 43

The Constitution of Sudan, article 45 states that:

The State shall guarantee to persons with special needs the enjoyment of all the right and freedoms set out in this Constitution; especially respect for their human dignity, access to suitable education, employment and full participation in society. The elderly shall have the right to the respect of their dignity. The State shall provide them with the necessary care and medical services as shall be regulated by law.44

As shown in the court cases presented in 5.1 above, which involved Alsier Mustafa Khalfalah v Civil Service Recruitment Committee of Khartoum State, the claimant argued that the Civil Service Recruitment Committee of the State of Khartoum had failed to discharge its obligations under the National Civil Service Act 2007. Thus, these rights are not adequately implemented in practice. Furthermore, the exclusion of persons with disabilities in the national legislature (see 11.4) is contradictory of the equal right clause.

11.5 Specific categories experiencing particular issues/vulnerability.
  • Persons with disabilities

The Constitution of Sudan, article 87(a) stipulates that a person with ‘physical incapacity’ cannot be a member of National Legislature. This clause deliberately excludes people with disabilities as they are physically incapacitated by disability.

  • Women with disabilities

Women and girls with disabilities are excluded based on their disability status. They experience barriers of legal, physical, health, employment, skills development and attitudinal nature. 45

  • Children with disabilities

Sudan is characterised by displacement, 65 per cent of these are child refugees.46 The UNICEF report states that 2.6 million of children are in need of assistance. Due to most children suffering acute malnourishment and not receiving adequate healthcare; they tend to acquire different types of disabilities. 47 Sudan has several laws about the rights of children, and children with disabilities. The Constitution of Sudan, article 50 states that: ‘The State shall protect the rights of the child as provided in the international and regional conventions ratified by the Sudan’48. Although the Constitution grants these rights, we recommend that national DPOs be consulted to gain grassroots perspectives.

12 Future perspective

12.1 Are there any specific measures with regard to persons with disabilities being debated or considered in your country at the moment?

Sudan is striving to adopt the human rights approach instead of the medical approach to disability. So, there is a need to address the use of derogatory terms in their reports, for example terminologies like ‘hard of hearing’ instead of ‘hearing impairment’. Sudan needs to adopt internationally acceptable terms in the disability sector. There is also a need for Sudan to prioritise disability as a research area.49

Persons with disabilities are encouraged to cast their votes to exercise their right to vote, access free primary education, and the parents who deny them the right to access education and hide them might be charged by the state.

12.2 What legal reforms are being raised? Which legal reforms would you like to see in Sudan? Why?

Sudan needs to adopt a law to enforce the domestication of the Convention. There is a need to adjust laws so that they allow for the persons with disabilities to participate politically. Existing laws which allow for persons with disabilities to be institutionalised indefinitely need to be reviewed. The Constitution of Sudan and the Persons with Disabilities Act should be comprehensive in a manner that is inclusive of all. That is, by defining disability in a holistic way that excludes none. The Sudan Ministry of Education needs to ensure that inclusive education is properly implemented and monitored so that no child with a disability face stigma and discrimination.

 


1. ‘Population of Sudan’ https://fanack.com/sudan/ ‘Population of Sudan’ https://fanack.com/sudan/population-of-sudan/ (accessed 14 April 2021).

2. Sudan Demographics Profile 2018.

3. EA Baker Abubaker ‘Sudan’s experience in the measurement of disability’ https://unstats.un.org/unsd/demographic-social/meetings/2017/oman--disability-measure ment-and-statistics/Session%206/Sudan.pdf (accessed 15 August 2019).

4. As above.

5. Consideration of reports submitted by states parties under article 35 of the Convention: Initial reports of States parties due in 2011: Sudan, CRPD (9 September 2015) U Doc CRPD/C/SDN/1 (2015) https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/treatybodyexter nal/Download.aspx?symbolno=CRPD/C/SDN/1&Lang=en (accessed 19 August 2019)

6. International Justice Resource Center ‘Country Factsheet Series’ (last updated on 15 September 2017) https://ijrcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/South-Sudan.pdf (accessed 19 August 2019). United Nations Peacekeeping ‘UNMISS welcomes ratification of international human rights covenants in South Sudan’ https://peacekeeping.un.org/en/unmiss-welcomes-ratification-of-international-human-rights-covenants-south-sudan (accessed 19 August 2019).

7. Consideration of reports submitted by States parties under article 44 of the Convention: Concluding observations: Sudan, CRC Committee (2 October 2010) CRC/C/SDN/CO/3-4 (2010) https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/treatybodyexternal/Down load.aspx?symbolno=CRC/C/SDN/CO/3-4&Lang=En (accessed 19 August 2019).

8. Concluding Observations on the initial periodic report of Sudan, adopted by the Committee at its 53th session, UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) (30 August 2000) UN Doc E/C.12/1/Add.48 (2000) https://www.refworld.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/rwmain?page=category&skip=0&category=COI &publisher=CESCR&querysi=sudan&searchin=fulltext&sort=date (accessed 19 Au-gust 2019).

9. African Union, State Reports and Concluding Observations. The 4th and 5th periodic reports of the Republic of the Sudan in accordance with article 62 of the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights 2008-2012 https://www.achpr.org/statertcon (accessed 19 August 2019).

10. As above.

11. United Nations General Assembly ‘Report of the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review’ (11 July 2016) https://www.refworld.org/topic,50ffbce51b1,50ffbce 5208,57cd5ebf4,0,,,SDN.html (accessed 19 August 2019).

12. Reliefweb ‘Sudan: Human rights denied in the South’ Report from Refugees International (3 May 2006) https://reliefweb.int/report/sudan/sudan-human-rights-denied-south (accessed 19 August 2019).

13. Consideration of reports submitted by parties to the Convention under article 35: List of issues in relation to the initial report of the Sudan: Addendum: Replies of the Sudan to the list of issues, CRPD Committee 6 December 2017) UN Doc CRPD/C/SDN/Q/1/Add.1 (2017) http://docstore.ohchr.org/SelfServices/FilesHandler.ashx?enc=6Q kG1d%2FPPRiCAqhKb7yhsshFWwYHBqp81ht8%2F0NCH4mTt14CE6mOmIWHh3RvewBVEBdyccjuVygmNU0o%2Bw%2BzsHxxLv9dMGXSq9GpV%2BH4bfthL12YODU%2FgumtkgrWWvpwBNxqvSV61vKFgFHBoVlrIg%3D%3D (accessed 14 April 2021).

14. As above.

15. Sudan’s Constitution of 2019 https://www. constitute.org (accessed 14 April 2021).

16. Sec 18 of Sudan’s Constitution of 2019.

17. International Labour Office ‘Sudan Country Profile: Employment of People with Disabilities: The Impact of Legislation (East Africa)’ (March 2004) http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_emp/---ifp_skills/documents/publication/wcms_107841.pdf (accessed 19 August 2019).

18. Sida ‘Disability Rights in Sudan and South Sudan’ (2004) https://www.sida.se/globalassets/sida/eng/partners/human-rights-based-approach/disability/rights-of-persons-with-disabilities-sudan-and-south-sudan.pdf (accessed 19 August 2019).

19. International Labour Office (n 17).

20. Sida (n 18).

21. As above.

22. As above.

23. Art 4 of the Sudanese Transitional Constitutional Charter of 2019 (STCC).

24. The Equal Rights Trust Country Report Series: 4 ‘In search of confluence: Addressing discrimination and inequality in Sudan’ (October 2014) https://www.equalrightstrust. org/ertdocumentbank/Sudan%20-%20In%20Search%20of%20Confluence%20-%20 Full%20Report.pdf (accessed 19 August 2019).

25. As above.

26. W Sawahel ‘Five-year higher education disability strategy approved’ University World News 19 September 2018 https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=2018 0919111107210 (accessed 19 August 2019).

27. FMA Hassan ‘The Sudan Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Status Report’ The World Bank (November 2016) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311651834 (accessed 19 August 2019). For materials on law reform in Sudan, see Redress.org http://www.redress.org/africa/sudan

28. NHRC.

29. ‘Sudan: National Council for Persons with Disabilities underlines importance of integration of disabled persons in community’ AllAfrica 27 November 2017 https://allafrica.com/stories/201711280362.html (accessed 26 August 2019).

30. A Omar ‘ Women with disabilities, united for their rights in Sudan’ https://bridgingthegap-project.eu/women-disabilities-united-rights-sudan/ (accessed 25 Au-gust 2019).

31. ADD ‘Empowering disability activists in Africa and Asia’ (2019) https://www. add.org.uk/ (accessed 21 August 2019).

32. NCPD ‘National Council for Persons with Disabilities of Sudan’ https://www.sudanvision.net/2019/02/18/person-with-disabilities-organizations-workshop-to-align-sudan-national-general-education-act-with-the-international-convention-on-the-rights-of-persons-with-disabilities/ (accessed 27 August 2019).

33. As above.

34. M Awad ‘Person with Disabilities organizations workshop to align Sudan National General Education Act with the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities’ (2019). https://www.sudanvision.net/2019/02/18/person-with-disabilities-organizations-workshop-to-align-sudan-national-general-education-act-with-the-international-convention-on-the-rights-of-persons-with-disabilities/ (accessed 27 August 2019).

35. Sida (n 18).

36. Sida (n 18).

37. Omar (n 30).

38. Awad (n 34).

39. As above.

40. As above.

41. Sudan’s Constitution of 2005 https://www.policinglaw.info/assets/downloads/Constitution_of_Sudan_(2005).pdf (accessed 26 August 2019).

42. As above.

43. Art 12 of Sudan’s Constitution of 2019 https://www.policinglaw.info/assets/downloads/Constitution_of_Sudan_(2005).pdf (accessed 26 August 2019).

44. As above.

45. As above.

46. UNICEF ‘Children in Sudan: An overview of the situation of children in Sudan’ https://www.unicef.org/sudan/children-sudan (accessed 28 August 2019).

47. As above.

48. Art 12 of Sudan’s Constitution of 2005.

49. N Leon ‘Understanding disability in Sudan’ thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies of the University of Manitoba in partial fulfillment of the requirement of the degree of Master of Arts Interdisciplinary Masters Program in Disability Studies, University of Manitoba, 2012. https://mspace.lib.umanitoba.ca/jspui_org/bitstream/1993/5223/1/Nyerere_Leon.pdf (accessed 28 August 2019).

  • Marianne Séverin
  • Researcher at « Les Afriques dans le Monde » (LAM)/Science Po Bordeaux

  • M Séverin ‘Country report: Guinea’ (2021) 9 African Disability Rights Yearbook 231-253
  •  http://doi.org/10.29053/2413-7138/2021/v9a11
  • Download article in PDF

Summary

According to the 2019 statistical yearbook of the National Statistical Institute, the Guinean population is estimated at 12 218 337 inhabitants. According to the third household census published in 2017, 155 885 people have disabilities, that is 1,5 per cent of the total Guinean population. The most prevalent forms of disabilities include mobility and intellectual ‘impairments’, visual, hearing, speech and albinism.

Guinea signed and ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on 16 May 2007 and 8 February 2008 respectively. It also signed and ratified the Optional Protocol on 16 May 2007 and 8 February October 2008 respectively. Guinea did not submit its country report, although it was due in March 2010. In Guinea international agreements apply directly in domestic courts, which is the monist approach to international law. As a ratified instrument becomes law immediately, prior to any ratification, the National Assembly passes a law to approve the ratification of an instrument whose constitutionality would have been certified by the Constitutional Court. After ratifying the CRPD, Guinea adopted various measures to foster human rights in general and the rights of persons with disabilities in particular.

Article 25 of the Constitution of Guinea directly addresses disability: ‘Persons with disabilities are entitled to the assistance and the protection of the State, public authorities and society’. The law sets out the conditions of the assistance and protection to which persons disabilities are entitled. In addition, the Constitution indirectly addresses disabilities through its preliminary provision on ‘principles of fundamental rights’ in its articles 18 and 21 which provide for the right of employment for everyone. Finally, in article 30, the Constitution affirms everyone has the right to health and to physical and mental wellbeing.

Guinea has numerous pieces of legislation that directly address disability. The key ones are the Decree D/2018/108/PRG/SGG of 13 July 2018, on the protection and promotion of persons with disabilities and the Law on the Protection and Promotion of People with Albinism, 6 April 2021.

We did not find any case law in Guinea. However, the policies that directly address persons with disabilities are:

  • National Programme for the Inclusion and Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities to promote the full participation of disabled people in economic, social and cultural development by 2020 in the Republic of Guinea.
  • 2016-2020 National Economic and Social Development Plan which indirectly includes disability.
  • Education and training, with the intermediate objective of improving the access, supply and quality of education and training adapted to the needs of the national economy; and employment of vulnerable groups, the intermediate objective being to promote employment and entrepreneurship of young people, women and people with disabilities.

Other than ordinary courts or tribunals, Guinea does not have an official body or any other body that specifically addresses the violation of the rights of persons with disabilities.

Guinea has a National Human Rights Commission. Its mandate includes the protection of disability rights.

There are numerous organisations that represent and advocate for the rights and welfare of persons with disabilities in Guinea. These include: Guinean Network of Disability Organisations for the Promotion of the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (ROPACIDPH); Action for the Future of People with Disabilities in Guinea Association (AFHAG); Guinea Association for the Training and Social Reintegration of Persons with Disabilities (AGFRIS); National Confederation of Albinos of Guinea (CNAG); and the Foundation for the relief and the social integration of the albino (FONDASIA). These organisations contribute to the promotion of disability rights through awareness-raising. To improve their efficiency, there is a need to improve their capacity through training including on disability rights and financial subventions.

In Guinea, the Ministry of the Promotion of Women and Children, and National Directorate of Social Affairs attached to the Ministry of Employment (Decree n°96/PRG/SGG/96) are responsible for promoting and protecting the rights and welfare of persons with disabilities. Generally, they promote and oversee the social inclusion persons with disabilities.

People with albinism face very serious violation of their rights; they face marginalisation and violence. Particularly vulnerable in a context of extreme poverty, due to a lack of education, training and unemployment, they are reduced to begging mainly in Conakry (the capital). Myths and untruths abound when it comes to people with albinism. They are perceived as being able to bring good luck, to access wealth, power, or high social position, or given supernatural powers that can solve problems (sentimental, powerlessness etc). Because of these beliefs, they are victims of kidnapping, ritual crimes and face toxic relationships with people who only associate with them out of curiosity.

Although there are some good decrees to foster disability rights, it is imperative that they are implemented if they are to make a difference in the protection of disability rights. Children with disabilities should be a priority in terms of inclusive education/training and a real census for children with disabilities should be urgently carried out to address this.

1 Les indicateurs démographiques

1.1 Quelle est la population totale de la République de Guinée?

Selon l’annuaire statistique de 2019, de l’Institut Nationale de la Statistique, la population guinéenne est évaluée à 12 218 337 habitants.1

1.2 Méthodologie employée en vue d’obtenir des données statistiques sur la prévalence du handicap en République du Bénin. Quels sont les critères utilisés pour `déterminer qui fait partie de la couche des personnes handicapées en République de Guinée?

La République de Guinée a effectué un recensement général de la population des personnes en situation de handicap. Selon le troisième Recensement Général de la Population et de l’Habitation (RGPH-3), publié en 2017, 155 885 personnes en situation de handicap avaient été identifiées, soit 1.5 pour cent de l’effectif total de la population guinéenne. Elles ont été réparties selon le sexe, le lieu de résidence (zones urbaine/rurale), les régions, les tranches d’âge, la religion, la situation matrimoniale, du niveau d’instruction, et autres caractéristiques (ex. activités, catégorie socioprofessionnelle, niveau de vie, branche d’activité).2 Enfin, chaque personne déclarant être en situation de handicap, a dû mentionner le type de handicap. En cas de plusieurs handicaps, seul le plus important était retenu. Pour finir, la personne en situation de handicap devait se classer en fonction de la classification suivante: « infirmes des membres, inférieurs, infirmes des membres supérieurs, aveugle, muet, sourd/muet, sourd, déficience mentale, bossu, et albinos ».3

1.3 Quel est le nombre total et le pourcentage des personnes handicapées en République DE Guinée?

Selon l’INS (Institut national de la Statistique, 2017, sur une population totale de 10 503 132 habitants (2014), 1.5 pour cent de personnes en situation de handicaps ont été recensés, soit 155 885.4

1.4 Quel est le nombre total et le pourcentage des femmes handicapées en République de Guinée?

Sur les 155 885 personnes en situation de handicap, 73 338 sont des femmes, soit 47 pour cent.5

1.5 Quel est le nombre total et le pourcentage des enfants handicapés en République de Guinée?

Le Troisième Recensement Général de la Population et de l’Habitation (RGPH3) − Situation des personnes vivant avec handicap de 2014,6 prend en compte les enfants de 0 à 17 ans qui sont estimés à 56 063, soit 2.1 pour cent.7

1.6 Quelles sont les formes de handicap les plus répandues en République de la Guinée?

Il ressort du recensement (RGPH3) − 2014 que les formes de handicap les plus répandues sont respectivement:

  • les handicaps moteurs (44.9 pour cent membres supérieurs et 20 pour cent membres inférieurs);
  • handicap intellectuel (12.5 pour cent)
  • aveugle  (9.8 pour cent);
  • sourd-muet (5.1 pour cent);
  • malentendant (2.9 pour cent);
  • muet (2.9 pour cent);
  • l’albinisme (0,7%).

2 Obligations internationales

2.1 Quel est le statut de la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées (CDPH) en République de Guinée? La République de Guinée a-t-il signé et ratifié la CDPH? Fournir le(s) date(s). La République de Guinée a-t-il signé et ratifié le Protocole facultatif? Fournir le(s) date(s).

La République de Guinée a signé la Convention Relative aux Personnes Handicapées (CDPH), ainsi que son Protocole facultatif, le 16 mai 2007. Les CDPH et Protocole facultatif ont été ratifiés le 8 février 2008.8

2.2 Si la République de Guinée a signé et ratifié la CDPH, quel est/était le délai de soumission de son rapport? Quelle branche du gouvernement est responsable de la soumission du rapport? La République de Guinée a-t-il soumis son rapport? Sinon quelles sont les raisons du retard telles qu’avancées par la branche gouvernementale en charge?

Conformément à l’art 35 de la CDPH, la République Guinée était tenue de soumettre son rapport initial dans un délais de deux ans, soit à la date du 8 mars 2010.9 La République de Guinée n’a soumis aucun rapport. La raison de ce retard/absence est due à une transition au pouvoir en 2008 avec ses corollaires de crises politiques récurrentes qui sont intervenues jusqu’en 2010. Le Ministère de l’Action Sociale est responsable de la soumission des rapports.

2.3 Si la République de Guinée a soumis le rapport au 2.2 et si le comité en charge des droits des personnes handicapées avait examiné le rapport, veuillez indiquer si le comité avait émis des observations finales et des recommandations au sujet du rapport de la République de Guinée. Y’avait-il des effets internes découlant du processus de rapport liés aux questions handicapées de Guinée?

N/A.

2.4 En établissant un rapport sous divers autres instruments des Nations Unies, la Charte Africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples ou la Charte Africaine relative aux Droits et au bien-être de l’Enfant, la République de Guinée a-t-elle également fait mention spécifique du droit des personnes handicapées dans ses rapports les plus récents? Si oui, les observations finales adoptées par les organes statutaires ont-elles fait mention du handicap? Si pertinent, ces observations ont-elles été suivies d’effet? Etait-il fait mention des droits des handicapés dans le rapport de la Revue Périodique Universelle (RPU) des Nations Unies de la République de Guinée? Si oui, quels étaient les effets de ces observations ou recommandations?
  • Comité contre la torture

La République de Guinée n’a soumis qu’un rapport initial au titre de l’art 19 de la Convention contre la torture et autres peines ou traitements cruels, inhumains et dégradants, le 6 mai 2014. La République de Guinée a fait mention spécifique du droit des personnes en situations de handicap, plus spécifiquement du handicap physique ou mental de l’enfant, dans l’art 287 de la loi portant Code de l’enfant du 19 août 2008 qui accorde protection spéciale à l’enfant en danger10 ainsi que dans l’art 300 qui définit l’enfant handicapé, comme tout

enfant qui présente une limitation dans l’exercice d’une ou plusieurs activités de base de la vie courante consécutive à une déficience physique, sensorielle ou mentale d’origine congénitale ou acquise.11

Le Comité contre la torture, au 20 juin 2014, note avec satisfaction, la ratification de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées et son Protocol facultatif, le 8 février 2008.12

  • Comité des droits de l’homme

La République de Guinée a fait mention spécifique du Droit des personnes handicapées dans son rapport publié le 29 novembre 2017, en faisant mention de la nouvelle loi n° L/2014/072//CNT du 10 janvier 2014 portant Code du travail, en son art 5,13 consacrant le principe de la non-discrimination dans la sphère de l’emploi et du travail: cette loi interdisant à tout employeur ou son représentant de prendre en considération:

le handicap pour arrêter ses décisions relatives à l’embauche, la conduite et la répartition du travail, la formation professionnelle, l’avancement, la promotion, la rémunération, l’octroi d’avantages sociaux, la discipline ou la rupture du contrat de travail.14

Le Comité des droits de l’homme, dans la liste de points concernant le troisième rapport périodique de la Guinée, demande, dans le Cadre constitutionnel et juridique de l’application du Pacte (art 2) sur la non-discrimination, qu’il soit précisé s’il existe une législation complète:

a) apportant une définition et une incrimination claires de la discrimination, directe et indirecte; couvrant une liste complète de motifs de discrimination, y compris l’identité sexuelle et de genre, et le handicap ... D’indiquer les mesures prises pour combattre et pour prévenir les actes de discrimination, de stigmatisation ou de violence à l’encontre: des personnes albinos. Indiquer les mesures destinées à assurer la non-discrimination des personnes handicapées dans tous les domaines, y compris en matière d’éducation et de participation aux affaires publiques.15

Soumis le 16 septembre 2018, le rapport conjoint de la Confédération Nationale des Albinos de Guinée (CNAG) et de l’ONG Under the Same Sun, fait état de violence à l’encontre des personnes atteintes d’albinisme, ainsi que leur discrimination et marginalisation. Les enfants atteints d’albinisme sont d’ailleurs reniés par leurs pères biologiques, De nombreuses croyances infondées entourent les personnes atteintes d’albinisme. Sur la question relative au Droit à la vie et la sécurité de la personne, le rapport stipule que l’Etat a failli dans la protection et la prévention des violences contre les personnes atteintes d’albinisme.16

  • Comité pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes

Conformément à l’art 18 de la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes, la République de Guinée n’a pas rendu son rapport au 1e novembre 2018. Dans son rapport publié le 11 janvier 2013, l’Etat partie a fait mention spécifique des Droits des personnes en situation de handicap.17 En Annexe I - Question du Comité de suivi au Gouvernement. Domaine juridique et législatif:

Adopter et mettre en œuvre une loi spécifique sur les personnes handicapées; notamment les femmes et filles; Ratification de la Convention Internationale sur la protection des personnes handicapées en 2008 et l’adoption d’une loi spécifique sur les personnes handicapées notamment les filles et les femmes .18

Dans la liste des questions relatives au rapport unique de la République de Guinée valant septième et huitième rapports périodiques dans le « Groupe des femmes défavorisées », il a été demandé à l’Etat partie de:

donner des informations sur les mesures prises ou envisagées par les autorités pour les groupes de femmes défavorisées dont les femmes handicapées.19

Le 3 juin 2014, la République de Guinée, dans sa réponse concernant « les groupes des femmes défavorisées », faisait état de la ratification de la Convention sur la protection des personnes en situation de handicap et d’une « campagne de dissémination de la convention entreprise par la Fédération guinéenne des associations de personnes handicapées. Avait été mise en place une mesure temporaire pour permettre aux personnes en situation de handicap d’accéder à l’emploi public. Enfin un projet de loi sur la protection des personnes en situation de handicap était élaborée.20 Dans ses observations finales du 14 novembre 2014, le Comité se félicitait de l’adhésion de la République de Guinée à la CDPH et au protocole facultatif s’y rapportant (2008).21 Sur la question des « Groupes de femmes défavorisées » le Comité s’est dit préoccupé par la situation ... des femmes en situation de handicap, victimes de formes multiples de discrimination:

En ce qui concerne l’accès à la terre, l’éducation, l’emploi, un logement convenable, les soins de santé et les services sociaux. Il déplore l’insuffisance d’informations fournies par l’Etat partie à cet égard.22

Le Comité demande à la République de Guinée de faire figurer dans son prochain rapport périodique: « Des informations détaillées, notamment des données ventilées, et tout autre renseignement sur des réalisations et des programmes particuliers relatifs à la situation .... des femmes handicapées ».23

  • Comité de droits économiques, sociaux et culturels

La République de Guinée a fait mention spécifique, dans son rapport soumis le 29 mars 2019, du Droit des personnes en situation de handicap, avec la « Loi L/2018/021/AN du 15 mai 2018 portant protection et promotion des personnes handicapées » et dans « le cadre de l’application de cette loi, des initiatives comme le programme citoyen sont en cours ».24

Le Comité recommande à l’Etat partie:

D’améliorer la collecte, l’analyse et la diffusion de données complètes et comparables, afin de déterminer dans quelle mesure les groupes et personnes défavorisées et marginalisées, notamment ... les personnes handicapées ... jouissent de leurs droits économiques, sociaux et culturelles.25

Le Comité prend note de:

L’adoption de la loi n° L/2018/021/AN du 15 mai 2018 portant protection et promotion des personnes handicapées. Il reste néanmoins préoccupé par le fait que les textes d’application de cette loi n’ont pas encore été adoptés, et que l’Art. 23 de la loi n’impose pas explicitement une exigence d’aménagement raisonnable. Le Comité est également préoccupé par le fait que les personnes handicapées sont défavorisées en matière d’accès à l’éducation, à l’emploi, et aux biens et services publics (art 2).26

  • Comité des droits de l’enfant

Dans son rapport valant troisième à sixième rapports périodiques, en application de l’article 44 de la Convention, la Guinée a répondu que:

Il n’y a pas encore une politique nationale et une stratégie spécifique et qui garantissent effectivement aux enfant porteurs de handicap leur dignité, leur autonomie, et leur participation active à la communauté ...; Les services programmes et projets significatifs destinés aux enfants porteurs de handicap sont rares.27

Dans ses observations du 28 février 2019, le Comité fait remarquer que:

Eu égard à son observation générale n°9 (2006) sur les droits des enfants handicapés et à ses recommandations précédentes (CRC/C/GIN/CO/2, par. 64), le Comité recommande à l’Etat partie d’adopter une approche du handicap fondée sur les droits de l’Homme, de mettre en œuvre la loi de 2018 sur la protection des personnes handicapées et d’établir une stratégie globale pour l’inclusion des enfants handicapées. Il prie instamment l’Etat partie d’assurer l’éducation inclusive, l’accès aux services de santé, et l’apport d’aménagements raisonnables dans tous les domaines de la vie et à tous les handicaps sensoriels, ainsi qu’élaborer des programmes de sensibilisation pour lutter contre la stigmatisation des enfants handicapés.28

L’organisation de la société civile - Coalition des ONGs de protection et promotion des droits de l’Enfant luttant contre la Traite (COLTE/CDE) − dans un rapport soumis au Comité le 7 mai 2018, indique que les enfants en situation de handicap sont discriminés, marginalisés et ne bénéficient pas de services de protection et de soutient adéquat. La COLTE/CDE dénonce le manque, voir l’absence d’aménagements raisonnables en faveur des enfants en situation de handicap. Cependant, l’organisation reconnait un effort - bien qu’insuffisant - « au niveau de l’éducation, la politique éducative et les réformes des curricula et les installations prenant en compte le cas des enfants en situation de handicap ».29

  • Commission africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples

Dans le 47ième Rapport d’activités de la Commission africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuple, présenté conformément à l’art 54 de la Charte Africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples, lors de la 65ième Session ordinaire, l’état de présentation des Rapports montrait que la Guinée fait partie des 18 pays ayant plus de 3 rapports en retard.30

  • Examen Périodique Universel31

La République de Guinée a mentionné dans son rapport son adhésion à la Convention Relative aux Droit des Personnes Handicapées et le Protocole facultatif s’y rapportant et le vote de la Loi n° L/2018/021/AN du 15 mai 2018 portant protection et promotion des personnes handicapées, promulguée par décret n° D/2018/108//PRG/SGG du 13 juillet 2018,32 qui assure l’égalité des chances aux personnes en situation de handicap et les protège de toutes les formes de discrimination.33

Dans le rapport du groupe de travail sur l’Examen périodique universel du 24 mars 2020 (A/HRC/44/5), il est fait mention de l’élaboration et de l’adoption d’un programme d’inclusion des personnes en situation de handicap.34 Plusieurs pays (Mexique, Afrique du Sud, Turquie, Brésil, Bulgarie, République islamique, Mauritanie, la Chine) ont salué la Guinée pour ses efforts en faveur de la protection et la promotion des droits des personnes en situation de handicap, dont un travail législatif important en leur faveur et le développement de l’éducation et des soins de santé en faveur des personnes en situation de handicap.35

Aux termes des conclusions et/ou recommandations, la Mauritanie demande à la Guinée de renforcer les capacités de l’Institution nationale des Droits de l’Homme en faveur notamment des droits des personnes en situation de handicap et de leur pleine inclusion dans la société.36 Il est également demandé à la Guinée la poursuite de ses mesures en faveurs de personnes en situation de handicap (Chine et Soudan).37 L’Algérie demande l’adoption de textes d’application de Loi n° L/2018/021/AN du 15 mai 2018 et de la mise en place « d’une politique nationale et d’une stratégie spécifique favorisant l’autonomie des personnes en situation de handicap.38 L’Angola demande une meilleur réadaptation, inclusion et intégration des personnes en situation de handicap.39 Enfin, la Bulgarie incite à l’adoption d’objectifs spécifiques concernant l’accessibilité des services aux personnes en situation de handicap.40

2.5 Y’avait-il un quelconque effet interne sur le système légal de la République de Guinée après la ratification de l’instrument international ou régional au 2.4 ci-dessus?

L’article 9n in fine, du Code civil de la Guinée, qui fixe la hiérarchie des normes juridique, qui dit que les conventions, accords et traités internationaux ont une valeur supérieure aux lois et décrets. C’est pourquoi, la ratification de la Convention Relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées (CRDPH) et du Protocol facultatif, par la Guinée, le 8 février 2008, a eu pour effet, l’adoption de la Loi n° L/2014 /072//CNT du 10 janvier 2014, qui selon l’article 5 du Code du travail, interdit toute discrimination pour cause de handicap.41 La ratification de CRDPH a également eu pour effet, le vote de la Loi n° L/2018/021/AN du 15 mai 2018 portant protection et promotion des personnes en situation de handicap.42 Le 6 avril 2021, l’Assemblée nationale a adopté à l’unanimité le texte de loi portant promotion et protection des personnes atteintes d’albinisme.43

2.6 Les traités internationaux ratifiés deviennent-ils automatiquement loi nationale sous votre système légal? Si oui y’a-t-il des cas où les cours et tribunaux appliquent directement les dispositions du traité international?

Selon l’art 148 de la Constitution de la République de Guinée de 2020, « Les traités de paix, les traités de commerce, les traités ou accords relatifs à l’organisation internationale, ceux qui engagent les finances de l’Etat, ceux qui modifient les dispositions de nature législative, ceux qui sont relatifs à l’état des personnes, ceux qui comportent cession, échange ou adjonction de territoire, ne peuvent être ratifiés ou approuvés qu’après autorisation de l’Assemblée Nationale ». « Si la Cour Constitutionnelle saisie par le Président de la République ou un Député, a déclaré qu’un engagement international comporte une clause contraire à la Constitution, l’autorisation de le ratifier ou de l’approuver ne peut intervenir qu’après la révision de la Constitution. Une loi autorisant la ratification ou l’approbation d’un engagement international ne peut être promulguée et entrer en vigueur lorsqu’elle a été déclarée non conforme à la Constitution » (art 149). « Les traités ou accords régulièrement approuvés ou ratifiés ont, dès leur publication, une autorité supérieure à celle des lois, sous réserve de réciprocité » (art 150).44

2.7 En référence au 2.4 ci-dessus, la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées CDPH ou tout autre instrument international ratifié, en tout ou en partie, a-t-il été incorporé textuellement dans la législation nationale? Fournir les détails.

La ratification de la CDPH vaut son incorporation dans la législation guinéenne; une procédure particulière ne semblait pas nécessaire. Dix ans après la ratification de la CDPH, a été adoptée une loi spécifique pour la protection et promotion des personnes en situation de handicap (la Loi n° L/2018/021/AN, 15 mai 2018). 

3 Constitution

 

3.1 La constitution de la République de la Guinée contient-elle des dispositions concernant directement le handicap? Si oui énumérez les dispositions et expliquez comment chacune d’elles traite du handicap.

La Constitution de la République de Guinée contient des dispositions directement relatives aux personnes en situation de handicap. Selon l’art 25, les personnes en situation de handicap « ont droit à l’assistance et à la protection de l’Etat, des collectivités publiques et de la société. « La loi fixe les conditions d’assistance et de protection auxquelles ont droit (....) les personnes en situation de handicap ». 45

3.2 La constitution de la République de Guinée contient-elle des dispositions concernant indirectement le handicap? Si oui énumérez les dispositions et expliquez comment chacune d’elles traite indirectement du handicap.

La Constitution de mars 2020, proclame dans son préambule son « attachement aux droits fondamentaux de la personne humaine, tels que consacrés dans la Charte des Nations Unies de 1945, la déclaration universelle des Droits de l’homme de 1948, les Pactes internationaux des Nations Unies de 1966, la Charte Africaine  des  droits de l’homme et des peuples de 1981 et ses  protocoles  additionnels, l’Acte constitutif de l’Union Africaine  de  2001 ainsi que ceux de la CEDEAO et les textes internationaux en la matière ratifiés par la République de Guinée. Selon l’article 5 la personne humaine est sacrée, les droits de la personne humaine sont inviolables, inaliénables et imprescriptibles et tout individu a le droit au respect de sa dignité et à la reconnaissance de sa personnalité. Toute personne a le droit au travail et à une rémunération sans aucune discrimination (art 18). Toute personne a le droit à la santé, et au bien-être physique et mental (art 21). Enfin dans son art 30, la Constitution affirme que l’Etat « doit promouvoir le bien-être des citoyens, protéger et défendre les droits de la personne humaine (....). Il garantit l’égal accès aux emplois.

4 Législation

4.1 La République de la Guinée a-t-il une législation concernant directement le handicap? Si oui énumérez la législation et expliquez comment la législation aborde le handicap.

La République de Guinée a une législation effective concernant directement le handicap.

  • La loi du 15 mai 2018 L/2018/021/AN, promulguée par le décret D/2018/108/PRG/SGG du 13 juillet 2018 portant protection et promotion des personnes en situation de handicap de la République Guinée.46
  • La loi du 6 avril 2021 portant promotion et protection des droits des personnes atteintes d’albinisme. Cette loi a pour vocation de changer le comportement de la population à l’endroit des personnes atteintes d’albinisme, leur accès aux services sociaux de base (santé, éducation, loisirs, inclusion sociale, autonomisation et meilleure protection juridique). Toute personne étant auteur ou complice d’enlèvements de personnes atteintes d’albinisme pour des crimes rituels, est condamnable de 5 à 20 ans de prison.47
4.2 La République de la Guinée a-t-il une législation concernant indirectement le handicap? Si oui énumérez la principale législation et expliquez comment elle réfère au handicap.

La République de Guinée a une législation concernant indirectement le handicap:

  • La loi n° L/2014/072/CNT du 10 janvier 2014, portant Code de travail, en son article 4 consacrant le principe de la non-discrimination dans la sphère de l’emploi et du travail. Cette interdit toute discrimination à « l’embauche, la conduite et la répartition du travail, la formation professionnelle, l’avancement, la promotion, la rémunération, l’octroi d’avantages sociaux, la discipline ou la rupture du contrat de travail » pour cause de handicap.48

5 Décisions des cours et tribunaux

5.1 Les cours (ou tribunaux) de la République de Guinée ont-ils jamais statué sur une question(s)relative au handicap? Si oui énumérez le cas et fournir un résumé pour chacun des cas en indiquant quels étaient les faits; la (les) décision(s), la démarche et l’impact (le cas échéant) que ces cas avaient entrainés.

Nous n’avons pas trouvé de décisions de justice portant sur le handicap.

6 Politiques et programmes

 

6.1 La République de Guinée a-t-il des politiques ou programmes qui englobent directement le handicap? Si oui énumérez la politique et expliquez comment cette politique aborde le handicap.

Suite à la promulgation de la loi partant sur la protection et la promotion des personnes en situation de handicap, a été validé, le 16 décembre 2019, le Programme National d’Inclusion et d’Autonomisation des Personnes Handicapées visant à promouvoir une pleine participation des personnes en situation de handicap au développement économique, social et culturel à l’horizon 2020 en République de Guinée.49 Ce Programme a pour but:

1) d’inviter les familles à déclarer les enfants en situation de handicap à l’Etat civil et leur permettre d’accéder à l’éducation générale ou la formation professionnelle;

2) de mettre en place des forces appareillages orthophoniques et orthopédiques.

3) Avec le PNUD un projet pilote a été créé afin de permettre à des jeunes en situations de handicap d’être formés, coachés et équipés. Le but étant de permettre à ces jeunes de prendre en charge leurs familles pouvant être composées de personnes en situation de handicap ou non. Sur fonds propres l’Etat a donc créé un Centre d’apprentissage de Métiers pour personnes handicapées.50

6.2 La République de Guinée a-t-il des politiques ou programmes qui englobent indirectement le handicap? Si oui énumérez chaque politique et décrivez comment elle aborde indirectement le handicap.

La République de Guinée a eu un Plan National de Développement Economique et Social 2016-2020 qui englobe indirectement le handicap:

  • Education et formation: avec pour objectif intermédiaire d’améliorer l’accès, l’offre et la qualité de l’éducation et de la formation adaptés aux besoins de l’économie nationale:

D’ici à 2030, éliminer les inégalités entre les sexes dans le domaine de l’éducation et assurer l’égalité d’accès des personnes vulnérables, y compris les personnes handicapées, les autochtones et les enfants en situation vulnérable, à tous les niveaux d’enseignement et de formation professionnelle.51

  • Emploi des couches vulnérables: l’objectif intermédiaire étant de promouvoir l’emploi et l’entreprenariat des jeunes, des femmes et des personnes en situation de handicap.

D’ici à 2030, parvenir au plein emploi productif et garantir à toutes les femmes et à tous les hommes, y compris les jeunes et les personnes handicapées, un travail décent et un salaire égal pour un travail de valeur égale.52

7 Organismes handicapés

7.1 En dehors des cours ou tribunaux ordinaires, la République de Guinée a-t-il un organisme officiel qui s’intéresse spécifiquement de la violation des droits des personnes handicapées? Si oui décrire l’organe, ses fonctions et ses pouvoirs.

Non, en dehors des cours ou tribunaux ordinaires, la République de Guinée ne dispose pas d’un organisme official qui s’intéresse spécifiquement à la violation des droits des personnes handicapées.

7.2 En dehors des cours ou tribunaux ordinaires, la République de Guinée a-t-il un organisme officiel qui, bien que n’étant pas spécifiquement en charge de la violation des droits des personnes handicapées s’y attèle tout de même? Si oui décrire l’organe, ses fonctions et ses pouvoirs.

La Guinée ne dispose pas d’un organisme officiel qui, bien qu’étant pas spécifiquement en charge de la violation des droits des personnes en situation de handicap s’y attèle.

8 Institutions Nationales des Droits de l’Homme (Commission des Droits de l’Homme ou Oumbudsman ou Protecteur du Citoyen)

8.1 La République de Guinée est-il doté d’une Commission de Droits de l’Homme ou d’un Ombudsman ou d’un Protecteur du Citoyen? Si oui ses missions incluent-elles la promotion et la protection des droits des personnes handicapées? Si votre réponse est oui, indiquez également si la Commission de Droits de l’Homme ou l’Ombudsman ou le Protecteur du Citoyen de la République de Guinée n’a jamais abordé des questions relatives aux droits des personnes handicapées.

La République de Guinée est dotée d’une Institution Nationale Indépendante des Droits de l’Homme (INIDH)53 conformément à la loi organique n° L/08/CNT/2011 du 14 juillet 201154 et mise en place en 2014 par décret D/2014/261/PRG/SGG du 30 décembre 2014.55 La mise en place de l’INIDH et son fonctionnement ne semble pas entièrement effectifs compte tenu du manque de budget adéquate et de personnel suffisant, formé et stable.56 L’INIDH n’a pas directement abordé des questions relatives aux droits des personnes, cependant y est inscrit dans ses missions l’apport ou la facilitation judiciaire aux victimes des violations des droits humains, en particulier les femmes, les enfants et autres personnes vulnérables.57

9 Organsation des personnes handicapées (OPH) et autres Organisations de la Société Civile

9.1 Avez-vous en République de Guinée des organisations qui représentent et défendent les droits et le bien-être des personnes handicapées? Si oui énumérez chaque organisation et décrivez ses activités.

Il existe en République de Guinée des organisations qui représentent et défendent les droits des personnes en situation de handicap:

  • Réseau Guinéen des Organisations des Personnes Handicapées pour la Promotion de la Convention Internationale sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées (ROPACIDPH), fondé en 2010. Cette ONG promeut « l’application des Droits fondamentaux des personnes en situation de handicap en général et plus particulièrement la Convention Internationale sur les droits des personnes handicapées ainsi que le renforcement de leurs capacités opérationnelles et institutionnelles ».58 Le ROPACIDPH a conçu un guide sur les droits des personnes handicapées en république de Guinée et organiser 14 ateliers d’appropriation du guide qui a permis de former plus de 330 cadres des structures déconcentrées et décentralisées du pays. Il a également élaboré le guide sur la prise en compte de la dimension handicap dans le processus électoral en république de Guinée. Il est à l’origine de la loi sur la protection et promotion des personnes handicapées de la République de Guinée.
  • Association « Action pour le Futur des personnes handicapées de Guinée » (AFHAG), créée en 2012 pour la réinsertion professionnelle des personnes en situation de handicap et leur sortie de la mendicité.59
  • Association Guinéenne pour la formation et la réinsertion sociale des personnes handicapées (AGFRIS).
  • Confédération Nationale des Albinos de Guinée (CNAG), lutte contre toutes formes de discrimination à l’encontre des personnes atteintes d’albinisme. La CNAG mène des campagnes de sensibilisation auprès des médias, constitue des dossiers de cas de violence contre les personnes atteintes d’albinisme, et est très active dans la mise en œuvre d’activités de la Journée Internationale de sensibilisation sur l’albinisme. Enfin elle travaille également en collaboration avec les institutions gouvernementales.60
  • Fondation pour le secours et l’insertion sociale des albinos (FONDASIA); créée en 1999, œuvre pour la défense des personnes atteintes d’albinisme contre toute forme de discrimination, de ségrégation et d’abus. En 2017, la FONDASIA travaillait sur un avant-projet de loi sur la protection et la promotion des personnes atteintes d’albinisme en Guinée, dont le droit à la santé, à l’éducation, à l’emploi, et la lutte contre le trafic d’organes et crimes rituels dont sont victimes les personnes atteintes d’albinisme; le 6 avril 2021, le texte de loi est adopté.61
9.2 Dans votre région, les OPH sont-elles organisées ou coordonnées au niveau national et/ou régional?

En République de Guinée, les OPH sont organisées en une Fédération Guinéenne pour la Promotion des Associations des Personnes Handicapées (FEGUIPAH). Créée en 1992, la FEGUIPAH est constituée de 59 associations, coordonnées elles-mêmes par 12 antennes régionales. La FEGUIPAH, qui est effective, appuie le gouvernement guinéen dans la conception et la mise en œuvre de politiques nationales en faveur de la protection et la promotion des droits des personnes en situation de handicap.62

En plus de la FEGUIPAH, il y a le Réseau Guinéen des Organisations des Personnes Handicapées pour la Promotion de la Convention Internationale sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées (ROPACIDPH) composé de 74 associations de personnes handicapées toutes catégories de handicaps confondus sur toute l’étendue du territoire nation qui appui le gouvernement dans la formulation et la mise en œuvre de politiques nationale de promotion et protection ainsi que de programmes d’autonomisation et de textes législatifs et règlementaires spécifiques.

9.3 Si la République de Guinée a ratifié la CDPH, comment a-t-il assuré l’implication des Organisations des personnes handicapées dans le processus de mise en œuvre?

En Guinée, il existe un cadre de concertation permanente entre la Direction nationale de l’Action Sociale et les organisations des personnes handicapées à travers trois (3) organisations faitières que sont la FEGUIPAH, le ROPACIDPH et la fédération handisport. Toutes les initiatives majeures visant la protection et la promotion des personnes handicapées sont discutées au sein de ce cadre de concertation. Les organisations des personnes handicapées sont le plus souvent initiatrices des changements avec l’accompagnement du Gouvernement guinéen. C’est ainsi que par exemple:

  • Du 4 au 5 décembre 2018, le Réseau Guinéen des Organisations des Personnes Handicapées pour la Promotion de la Convention Internationale sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées (ROPACIDPH), en partenariat avec le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux Droits de l’Homme (HCDH) a organisé un atelier « d’appropriation et de validation technique des textes d’application de la loi portant promotion et protection des personnes en situation de handicap en Guinée.63
  • Suite à la ratification de la Convention des Droits des Personnes Handicapées, le gouvernement de Guinée s’est appuyé sur une proposition, élaborée par les associations de défense des personnes atteintes d’albinisme, dont la FONDASIA64. Le document qui a proposé des droits à la santé, à l’éducation, à l’emploi et a attiré l’attention des autorités sur le trafic d’organes et crime rituels dont sont victimes les personnes atteintes d’albinisme, a été la pierre angulaire de la Loi du 6 avril 2021 qui porte promotion et protection des droits des personnes atteintes d’albinisme.65
9.4 Quels genres d’actions les OPH ont-elles prise elles-mêmes afin de s’assurer qu’elles soient pleinement intégrées dans le processus de mise en œuvre?

Les OPH à travers la FEGUIPAH coopèrent afin d’assurer la diffusion d’informations, d’éducation, de communication et de mobilisation sociale autour de questions portant sur « l’exclusion sociale, les droits des personnes en situation de handicap, l’exploitation des enfants en situation de handicap à travers la mendicité, mais également les maladies sexuellement transmissibles et la planification familiale ». La FEGUIFAH est le pivot pour la coordination des actions des OPH locales (parfois internationales) et représente les personnes en situation de handicap auprès du gouvernement guinéen mais également les Nations Unies.66

Le ROPACIDPH, œuvre à la sensibilisation des pouvoirs publics et collectivités décentralisées sur l’inclusion du handicap dans la formulation et la mise en œuvre des politiques et les programmes de développement sociaux, sur la promotion et la protection des droits des personnes en situation de handicap, à l’éducation/formation inclusive, au droit à la santé, à l’emploi, aux loisirs et bien-être des personnes en situation de handicap.67

9.5 Quels sont, le cas échéant les obstacles rencontrés par les OPH lors de leur engagement dans la mise en œuvre?

Dépendant principalement des cotisations, de dons, de legs, ou de subventions, les OPH et plus généralement la Fédération Guinéenne pour la Promotion des Associations des Personnes Handicapées (FEGUIPAH), de nombreux projets portant sur la protection et la promotion socio-économique des personnes en situation de handicap, sont impossibles à mettre en œuvre ou sont abandonnés, d’autant plus que l’Etat guinée n’offre pas d’aide économique. Ces obstacles financiers sont d’autant plus problématiques que la FEGUIPAH collabore grandement avec les institutions gouvernementales, tels que le Conseil Economique et Social (CES), l’Assemblée Nationale, le Ministère des Affaires sociales, mais également, au niveau international, avec l’Organisation Mondiale des Personnes Handicapées (OMPH), l’Agence de Coopération Internationale des Personnes Handicapées (Canada), de l’Institut Africain de Réadaptation (IAR), de la Fédération Ouest Africaine des Personnes Handicapées (FOAPH), de la Panafricaine des Personnes Handicapées (PANAPH).68

9.6 Y’a-t-il des exemples pouvant servir de ‘modèles’ pour la participation des OPH?

Les organisations faitières principales que sont la FEGUIPAH et le ROPACIDPH jouent un rôle prépondérant auprès des pouvoirs publics. Le ROPACIDPH en particulier joue un rôle consultatif de premier plan auprès des pouvoir publics et des collectivités décentralisées. Le ROPACIDPH met toutes ses compétences à la disposition des pouvoirs publics et des organisations des personnes en situation de handicap et de tous les acteurs guinéens intéressés.

9.7 Y’a-t-il des résultats spécifiques concernant une mise en œuvre prospère et/ou une reconnaissance appropriée des droits des personnes handicapées résultant de l’implication des OPH dans le processus de mise en œuvre?

Oui. La loi sur la protection et la promotion des personnes en situation de handicap, le programme national d’autonomisation des personnes en situation de handicap en cours d’exécution ainsi que la Loi du 26 avril 2021 portant promotion et protection des droits des personnes atteintes d’albinisme, sont des exemples concrets de l’implication active et du leadership des OPH.

9.8 Votre recherche (pour ce projet) a-t-elle identifié des aspects qui nécessitent le développement de capacité et soutien pour les OPH afin d’assurer leur engagement dans la mise en œuvre de la Convention?

Au vu de l’engagement et la compétence de certaines OPH dans la promotion et la protection des droits des personnes en situation de handicap en Guinée, elles devraient bénéficier d’un appui institutionnel conséquent de la part l’Etat afin de leur permettre de jouer pleinement leur rôle. En plus de subventions pour leur fonctionnement, elles devraient être appuyées dans le développement de leurs ressources humaines par la formation continue.

9.9 Y’a-t-il des recommandations provenant de votre recherche au sujet de comment les OPH pourraient être plus largement responsabilisées dans les processus de mise en œuvre des instruments internationaux ou régionaux?

Les OPH devraient être pleinement associées et représentées dans les structures de prises de décision à tous les niveaux parmi leurs membres. Elles devraient également être associées à la soumission des rapports et faire partie des délégations officielles en charge de présenter et défendre ces rapports. Pour finir, elles devraient être consultées tout comme le gouvernement en vue de produire des rapports contradictoires qui permettraient de mettre beaucoup plus en lumière la réalité qui est souvent occultées par le Gouvernements. Par conséquent, La FEGUIPAH et le ROPACIDPH pourraient être parties prenantes dans la rédaction et la présentation du rapport conformément à l’art 35 de la CDPH qui aurait dû être soumis 8 mars 2010, ainsi qu’accompagner et faire pression auprès du gouvernement guinéenne.

9.10 Y’a-t-il des instituts de recherche spécifiques dans votre région qui travaillent sur les droits des personnes handicapées et qui ont facilité l’implication des OPH dans le processus, y compris la recherche?

Non pas pour le moment.

10 Branches gouvernementales

10.1 Avez-vous de(s) branche(s) gouvernementale(s) spécifiquement chargée(s) de promouvoir et protéger les droits et le bien-être des personnes handicapées? Si oui, décrivez les activités de cette (ces) branche(s).

Dès 1992, le gouvernement guinéen a créé le Secrétariat d’Etat aux Affaires Sociales à la Promotion Féminine et à l’Enfance, en charge de la promotion et la protection des femmes, des enfants et des groupes vulnérables. En 1994, ce Secrétariat d’Etat devient le Ministère en charge de la Promotion Féminine et de l’Enfance; la Direction Nationale des Affaires Sociales est rattachée au ministère de l’Emploi (Décret N°96/PRG/SGG/96). Par Décret N° 081/PRG/SGG du 7 avril 2014, dans une volonté de renforcer l’épanouissement notamment des personnes en situation de handicap (ainsi que les femmes, les enfants et personnes âgées), est créé le ministère de l’Action Sociale de la Promotion Féminine et de l’Enfance. Ce ministère ayant pour mission de concevoir, d’élaborer et de mettre en œuvre la politique gouvernementales en matière de promotion féminine et du genre, de protection sociale et de l’enfance 69. Au sein de ce ministère récemment dénommée Ministère de l’action sociale et de l’enfance, il existe la Direction nationale de l’Action sociale (DNAS) qui a pour mandant entre autres la promotion et le développement de la politique, des programmes et stratégies du gouvernement dans le domaine de la promotion et de la protection des personnes handicapées. Cette Direction nationale comporte au niveau central une Division de l’inclusion et une section chargées de l’autonomisation des personnes en situation de handicap. Au niveau décentralisé, elle supervise et coordonne les activités de 8 Directions régionales de l’Action sociales et de 5 Directions communales de l’action sociale ainsi que 38 Directions Préfectorales de l’Action sociale qui sont ses répondantes aux niveaux régional, communal et Préfectoral.

11 Préoccupations majeures des droits de l’homme relatives aux personnes handicapées

11.1 Quels sont les défis contemporains des personnes handicapées en République de Guinée? (Exemple: Certaines régions d’Afrique pratiquent des tueries rituelles de certaines catégories de personnes handicapées telles que les personnes atteintes d’albinisme. A cet effet La Tanzanie est aux avant-postes. Nous devons remettre en cause les pratiques coutumières qui discriminent, blessent et tuent les personnes handicapées.

Les personnes atteintes d’albinisme sont confrontées à de très grands défis en matière de violation de leurs droits en Guinée. Selon le rapport (septembre 2018) de l’ONG Under the Same Sun, les personnes atteintes d’albinisme font face à de nombreux préjudices, à la marginalisation et à la violence. Population particulièrement vulnérable dans un contexte d’extrême pauvreté, dû au manque d’éducation, de formation et de chômage, les personnes atteintes d’albinisme sont réduites à la mendicité principalement dans la capitale (Conakry). Les mythes et contre-vérités sont légion quand il est question des personnes atteintes d’albinisme en Guinée. En effet, elles sont perçues comme pouvant porter chance, pour accéder à la richesse, au pouvoir, ou position sociale élevée. On leur prête également des pouvoirs surnaturels pouvant régler des problèmes d’ordre sentimental, d’impuissance, etc. Ces croyances ont pour conséquences, que ces personnes atteintes de d’albinisme soient victimes de kidnapping, crimes rituels et confrontées à des relations toxiques avec des personnes ne les fréquentant que par intérêt.70

Les autres types de handicaps ne font pas exception à la règle; les personnes présentant des handicaps visuels et moteurs, qui faute d’éducation et de formation professionnelle ainsi que d’opportunités de réinsertion socio - économiques, sont dans l’extrême pauvreté et la misère. Elles vivent dans les rues de la capitale sous les ponts dans des abris de fortune d’où elles sont chassées la plupart du temps.

11.2 Comment la République de Guinée répond-t-il aux besoins des personnes handicapées au regard des domaines ci-dessous énumérées?

Pour répondre aux besoins des personnes en situation de handicap, le texte de loi portant promotion et protection des personnes atteintes d’albinisme71. En outre, le projet de loi révisée sur la promotion et protection des personnes en situation de handicap, qui sera très prochainement adopté par l’Assemblée nationale, comporte de nombreuses dispositions pour répondre aux besoins essentiels des personnes en situation de handicap, en termes d’accès gratuit aux services d’éducation, de santé, de transport, à l’emploi, aux loisirs ainsi que d’accessibilité, de compensation financières et de facilités variées.72

11.3 La République de Guinée accorde-t-il des subventions pour handicap ou autre moyen de revenue en vue de soutenir les personnes handicapées?

Fonds de Développement Social et de Solidarité (FDSS) apporte un appui ponctuel en faveur des jeunes en situation de handicap. Le FDSS est financé à hauteur de 100 milliards GNF.73

11.4 Les personnes handicapées ont-elles un droit de participation à la vie politique (représentation politique et leadership, vote indépendant etc.) de la République de Guinée?

Oui. Selon le Chapitre VIII de la Loi N° L/2018/021/AN du 15 mai 2018, sur la participation à la vie politique et publique, les partis politiques doivent garantir « la représentation des personnes en situation de handicap dans les diverses instances de délibération et de prise de décisions » (art 42); de garantir leur représentativité à l’Assemblée nationale et dans les conseils communaux, les partis politiques devant inclure une personne handicapée sur leur liste et parmi les dix premières positions (art 43); le gouvernement devant « promouvoir un environnement favorable à la vie politique et politique des personnes handicapées .... » (art 44); « accessibilité aux personnes sourdes aux meetings politiques et campagnes électorales notamment l’interprétation en langue des signes » (art 45); « disponibilité du matériel électoral en formats accessibles, notamment les imprimés en braille, les spots télévisés avec interprétation en langue des signes (art 46); accessibilité des isoloirs « en comportant des rampes d’accès aux personnes handicapées en fauteuil roulant » (art 47); enfin « l’Etat doit promouvoir une politique nationale de représentation des personnes handicapées dans les structures de prise de décisions à tous les niveaux » (art 48).74 De plus, selon l’art 17 de la Constitution Guinéenne de 2020, « toute personne a le droit à la liberté de réunion et d’association dans les conditions fixées par la loi »; « chaque citoyen a le devoir de participer aux élections.... », selon l’article 29 de la Constitution de 2020.75

11.5 Catégories spécifiques expérimentant des questions particulières/vulnérabilité: Enfants en situation de handicap.

Selon le Chapitre VI de la Loi N° L/2018/021/AN du 15 mai 2018, il existe des dispositions particulières concernant les femmes et les enfants en situation de handicap. Les « femmes handicapées doivent bénéficier de toutes les dispositions permettant leur épanouissement spécifique.» (art 33); « conformément aux dispositions de la Convention relative aux Droits de l’Enfant (art 23) et de la CDPH, les enfants handicapés doivent être protégés contre toute forme d’exploitations et de traitement dégradants » (art 34); « les enfants handicapés devant mener une vie plaine et décente, favorisant leur autonomie et l’accès à l’éducation et à la formation et l’intégration à la vie de la communauté » (art 35); « l’obligation pour les parents d’assurer la protection et la promotion de leurs enfants handicapés, ou avec l’assistance de l’Etat, des collectivités décentralisées et associations... » (art 36).76

12 Perspective future

12.1 Y’a-t-il des mesures spécifiques débattus ou prises en compte présentement en République de Guinée au sujet les personnes handicapées?

Oui, la loi sur la protection et la promotion des personnes handicapées du 15 Mai 1998 comporte des insuffisances par rapport à la CDPH. Aussi il a été question de la révisée afin de palier à ses insuffisances et la rendre conforme entièrement au contenu de la CDPH. Il est aussi question de renforcer les actions de vulgarisation de la CDPH en vue de son appropriation par les autorités politiques et administratives et la population guinéenne y compris l’utilisation des langues nationales en raison de l’illettrisme de la majorité de la population guinéenne.77

Débats sur la vulgarisation de la loi du 15 mai 2018 portant égalité des chances en faveur des personnes en situation de handicap (L/2018/021/AN). La vulgarisation de la CDPH devant insuffler une meilleure inclusion des personnes en situation de handicap dans la société guinéenne, en éliminant tous les obstacles auxquels elles doivent faire face; « les personnes handicapées étant sevrées de leurs droits à cause de l’interaction entre leurs déficiences physiques, les barrières comportementales et environnementales qui ... font obstacles à la jouissance de leurs droits sur la base de l’égalité avec tous ».

12.2 Quelles réformes légales sont proposées? Quelle réforme légale aimeriez-vous voir en République de Guinée? Pourquoi?

La République de Guinée se doit accélérer les réformes légales au niveau de la révision de la loi sur la protection et la promotion des personnes du 15 mai 2018; celle-ci comportant des insuffisances par rapport à la CDPH. Cependant, le processus de révision de la dite loi est déjà achevé par l’incorporation entre autres d’un organe veille (Conseil National Indépendant des Personnes Handicapées) et d’un organe de coordination et de suivi des actions en faveur des personnes en situation de handicap (Comité national multisectoriel de coordination et de suivi des actions en faveur des personnes handicapées). La loi révisée devra être adoptée par l’Assemblée nationale et promulguée par le Président de la République. Les Décrets d’application, de ladite loi, signés.

La question des enfants en situation de handicap devrait être une priorité notamment en matière d’éducation/formation inclusive. Pour cela, il est urgent de mener un vrai recensement pour ce groupe vulnérable.

Des campagnes nationales sur tout le territoire, devraient être menées plus d’une fois par an (3 décembre), afin de combattre tous les préjugés, en particulier dans les familles (urbaines et rurales) spécifiquement et dans la société en général. Pour cela, le gouvernement devrait faire voter un budget significatif en faveur des OPH et également de l’Institution nationale des Droits de l’Homme.

Enfin, un centre de recherche sur la question des droits des personnes en situation de handicap devrait être créé.


1. Institut Nationale de la Statistique (INS) ‘Ministère du Plan et de la coopération internationale, Annuaire statistique’ (2019) 31 https://www.stat-guinee.org/images/Documents/Publications/INS/annuelles/annuaire/Annuaire_INS_2019_opt.pdf (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

2. Ministère du Plan et de la coopération internationale (RGPH3), décembre 2017 https://data space.princeton.edu/bitstream/88435/dsp01pk02cd514/13/DSGuineaRGPH3personneshandicap. pdf (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

3. RGPH3 (n 2).

4. RGPH3 (n 2) 27.

5. RGPH3 (n 2) 27 et à partir du tableau 2.5: Taux de handicap (%) et effectif des handicapées par milieu de résidence et par sexe, 30.

6. RGPH3 (n 2) 34.

7. RGPH3 (n 2) 34.

8. Nations Unies Droits de l’Homme Organes de traités ‘Statut de ratification de la Guinée - CRPD’ https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/Treaty.aspx?CountryID=71&Lang =FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

9. Comme ci-dessus.

10. Rapport de l’Etat partie, Comité contre la torture (25 juillet 2014) UN Doc CAT/C/GIN/1 (2014) 19 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?Country Code=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

11. Comme ci-dessus.

12. Observations finales concernant la Guinée en l’absence de rapport initial, Comité contre la torture (20 June 2014) UN Doc CAT/C/GIN/CO/1 (2014) 2 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

13. Troisième rapport périodique soumis par la Guinée en l’application de l’article 40 du Pacte, attendu en 1994, Comité des Droits de l’Homme (29 novembre 2017), UN Doc CCPR/C/GIN/3 (2017) 11 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode= GIN&Lang=FR , il a été mentionné art 4 dans le rapport. Il s’agit en fait de l’art 5 du Code du Travail https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---protrav/---ilo_aids/docu ments/legaldocument/wcms_301242.pdf (consulté le 22 septembre2021).

14. Comité des Droits de l’Homme (n 14) 11.

15. Liste de points concernant le troisième rapport périodique de la Guinée, Comité des Droits de l’Homme (24 mai 2018) UN Doc CCPR/C/GIN/Q/3 (2018) 2 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

16. CGNA ‘The civil and political rights of persons with Albinism in the Republic of Guinea’ (16 September 2018) 2-3; 4-8 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/coun tries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre2021).

17. Rapport de l’Etat partie, Comité pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes (11 janvier 2013) UN Doc CEDAW/C/GIN/7-8 (2013) 13 https://tbinter net.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN& Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

18. Comité pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes (n 18) 37-38.

19. Liste des questions relatives au rapport unique de la Guinée valant septième et huitième rapports périodiques, Comité pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes (9 mars 2014) UN Doc CEDAW/C/GIN/Q/7-8 (2014) 5 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

20. Comité pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes (n 20) 22.

21. Observations finales concernant les septième et huitième rapports périodiques (présentées en un seul document de la Guinée), Comité pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes (14 novembre 2014) UN Doc CEDAW/C/GIN/Q/7-8/CO (2014) 2 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

22. Comité pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes (n 22) 16.

23. Comme ci-dessus.

24. Rapport initial soumis par la Guinée en application des articles 16 et 17 du Pacte, attendu en 1990, Comité des droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (29 mars 2019) UN Doc E/C.12/GIN/1 (2019) 8 & 19 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?Country Code=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

25. ‘Observations finales concernant le rapport initial de la Guinée, Comité des droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (29 mars 2019) UN Doc E/C.12/GIN/CO/1 (2019) 3 https://tbinternet. ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021) (comme ci-dessus)

26. Comité des droits économiques (n 26) 4.

27. Rapport valant troisième à sixième rapports périodiques soumis par la Guinée en application de l’article 44 de la Convention, attendus en 2017 -VII. Handicap, soins santé de base et bien-être art. 6, 18 (par 3), 23, 24, 26 et 27 (par. 1 à 3) de la Convention, a) Enfants handicapés,  Comité des droits de l’enfant (7 août 2018), UN Doc CRC/C/GIN/3-6 (2018) 21 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

28. Observations finales concernant le rapport valant troisième à sixième rapports périodiques’ G. Handicap, soins santé de base et bien-être (art 6, 18 (par. 3), 23, 24, 26 et 27 (par. 1 à 3) et 33. Enfants handicapés, Comité des droits de l’enfant (28 février 2019) UN Doc CRC/C/GIN/CO/3-6 (2019) 9 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?Country Code=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

29. COLTE/CDE ‘Handicap, soins de santé de base et bien-être (art. 6, 18 (par. 3), 23, 24, 26 et 27 (par. 1 à 3) de la Convention) - d) Enfants handicapés’ (7 mai 2018) 16 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre2021).

30. Commission Africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples ‘47ème Rapport d’activités de la Commission Africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples’ (21 octobre-10 novembre 2019) 5 https://www.achpr.org/fr_activityreports/viewall?id=51 (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

31. Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies ‘Rapport du Groupe de travail sur l’Examen périodique universel* Guinée’ A/HRC/44/5 (24 mars 2020) https://www.ohchr.org/FR/HRBodies/UPR/Pages/GNIndex.aspx (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

32. United Nation Assembly ‘National report submitted in accordance with paragraph 5 of the annex to Human Rights Council resolution 16/21* Guinea’ A/HRC/WG.6/35/GIN/1 (11 November 2019) 4 & 7   https://undocs.org/A/HRC/WG.6/35/GIN/1 (consulté le 22 septembre 2021) Act L/2018/021/AN of 15 May 2018 on Equal Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities, promulgated by Decree D/2018/108/PRG/SGG of 13 July 2018; The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

33. United Nation Assembly, ‘National report submitted in accordance with paragraph 5 of the annex to Human Rights Council resolution 16/21* Guinea’ A/HRC/WG.6/35/GIN/1 (11 November 2019) 19, https://undocs.org/A/HRC/WG.6/35/GIN/1 (consulté le 22 septembre2021). In line with recommendation 118.192 on paying particular attention to vulnerable social groups such as women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons, ActL/2018/021/AN of 15 May 2018, which was promulgated by Decree D/2018/108/PRG/SGG of 13 July 2018, is intended to ensure equal opportunities for persons with disabilities and to promote their rights and protect them from all forms of discrimination.

34. Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies ‘Rapport du Groupe de travail sur l’Examen périodique universel* Guinée’ A/HRC/44/5 (24 mars 2020) 3 https://undocs.org/fr/A/HRC/44/5 (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

35. Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies (n 35) 6-8 .

36. Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies (n 35) 15.

37. Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies (n 35) 23-24.

38. Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies (n 35) 24.

39. Comme ci-dessus.

40. Comme ci-dessus.

41. Journal Officiel de la Réublique de Guinée, Loi n°L/2014/072/CNT du 10 janvier 2014 portant Code du travail de la République de Guinée, 1 https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---protrav/---ilo_aids/documents/legaldocument/wcms_301242.pdf (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

42. Observations finales concernant le rapport initial de la Guinée, Conseil économique et social des Nations Unies (30 mars 2020) UN Doc E/C.12/GIN/CO/1 (2020) 4 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

43. ‘Assemblée nationale: Trois textes dont celui portant protection et promotion des albinos en Guinée’ Mediaguinée 7 avril 2021 https://mediaguinee.org/assemblee-nationale-trois-textes-dont-celui-portant-protection-et-promotion-des-droits-des-albinos-adoptes/ (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

44. Constitution de la République de Guinée, XVI, mars 2020 https://guilaw.com/la-constitution-de-2020/ (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

45. Comme ci-dessus.

46. Conseil des Droits de l’Homme ‘Rapport national présenté conformément au paragraphe 5 de l’annexe à la résolution 16/21 du Conseil des droits de l’homme* Guinée’ (11 novembre 2019) 5 https://undocs.org/pdf?symbol=fr/A/HRC/WG.6/35/GIN/1 (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

47. Mediaguinée (n 44).

48. Code du travail de la République de Guinée, Loi N°L/2014/072/CNT du 10 janvier 2014, 4 https://www.invest.gov.gn/document/code-du-travail (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

49. ‘Conakry: Le ministère de l’Action Sociale et ses partenaires pour l’autonomisation des handicapés’ Guineematin.com 16 décembre 2019 https://guineematin.com/tag/programme-national-dinclusion-et-dautonomisation-des-personnes-handicapees/ (consulté le 22 septembre 2021). M Saliou Diallo ‘Guinée: le PNUD appuie les efforts du Gouvernement pour l’inclusion et l’autonomisation des personnes handicapées’ Guinée Eco 17 décembre 2019 https://www.guinee-eco.info/guinee-le-pnud-appuie-les-efforts-du-gouvernement-pour-linclusion-et-lautonomisation-des-personnes-handica pees/ (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

50. A Bah ‘Guinée: l’autonomisation des personnes handicapées dans les pays membres de l’OCI en débats à Conakry’ Guineenews.org 24 décembre 2019 https://guineenews.org/guinee-lautonomisation-des-personnes-handicapees-dans-les-pays-membres-de-loci-en-debats-a-conakry/ (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

51. Portail officiel du gouvernement guinéen ‘Plan National de Développement Economique et Social 2016-2020’ 112 https://www.gouvernement.gov.gn/index.php/plan-national-de-developpement-economique-et-social-2016-2020# (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

52. Comme ci-dessus.

53. Dans la Constitution de 2020, l’Institution Nationale Indépendante des Droits de l’Homme est devenue l’Institution Nationale Indépendante des Droits Humains (art 140). Constitution de la République de Guinée, XIV, mars 2020, https://guilaw.com/la-constitution-de-2020/ (consulté le 30 mai 2021).

54. Institution Nationale Indépendante des Droits de l’Homme, Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques (2018) CCPR/C/GIN/CO/3 dated 7 décembre 2018, 2 https://tbinternet. ohchr.org/_layouts/15/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx?symbolno=CCPR%2fC%2fGIN%2f CO%2f3&Lang=fr (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

55. Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies, Conseil des droits de l’homme ‘Rapport national présenté conformément au paragraphe 5 de l’annexe à la résolution 16/21 du Conseil des droits de l’homme* Guinée’ A/HRC/WG.6/35/GIN/1 (11 novembre 2019) 7 https://undocs.org/pdf?symbol=fr/A/HRC/WG.6/35/GIN/1 (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

56. Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques (n 55) 2 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx?symbolno=CCPR%2fC%2fGIN%2fCO%2f3& Lang=fr (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

57. Institution Nationale Indépendante des Droits de l’Homme (INIDH) ‘Activités’ http://inidh.org/#section-practicing-areas consulté le 22 septembre 2021.

58. NGO Branch-United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs ‘Réseau Guinéen des Organisations des Personnes Handicapées pour la Promotion de la Convention Internationale sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées (ROPACIDPH)’ (2015) https://esango.un.org/civilsociety/showProfileDetail.do?method=showProfileDetails&profileCode=636110&tab=3 (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

59. ‘Guinée: La réinsertion des personnes handicapées’ TV5Monde 4 décembre 2018 https://information.tv5monde.com/afrique/guinee-la-reinsertion-des-personnes-handicapees-274325 (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

60. Action on Albinism https://actiononalbinism.org/fr/page/b8dt441grii2hilq2jz41jor (consulté le 30 mai 2021).

61. Z Camara ‘Guinée: les albinos préparent une loi pour leur protection’ https://www. voaafrique.com/a/guinee-les-albinos-preparent-une-loi-qui-les-protegera/3821514.html (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

62. V Tchirkov La Guinée face au handicap. La problématique des déficiences motrices de Conakry (2012) (E.Book); Nantady Camara ‘Guinée: les lois sur la protection des handicapées bafouées’ Guinée Actuelle 11 décembre 2018 http://guineeactuelle.com/guinee-les-lois-sur-la-protection-des-handicapes-bafouees (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

63. MA Barry ‘ Guinée: vers la validation des textes d’application de la loi portant protection et promotion des personnes handicapées’ Aminata.com 5 décembre 2018 https://aminata.com/guinee-vers-la-validation-des-textes-dapplication-de-la-loi-portant-protection-et-promotion-des-personnes-handicapees/ (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

64. Camara (n 62).

65. Mediaguinée (n 44).

66. Tchirkov (n 63).

67. Nations Unies (n 59).

68. Tchirkov (n 63).

69. Ministère du Plan et la Coopération Internationale, Institut National de la Statistique & Bureau Central de Recensement ‘Troisième recensement général de la population et de l’habitation (RGPH3) - Situation des personnes vivant avec handicap’ (décembre 2017) 20 https://datas pace.princeton.edu/bitstream/88435/dsp01pk02cd514/13/DSGuineaRGPH3personneshandi cap.pdf (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

70. CGNA (n 17) 3; 5-8.

71. Z Camara ‘La Guinée se dote d’une loi pour la défense des personnes atteintes d’albinisme’ VOA Afrique 19 avril 2021 https://www.voaafrique.com/a/la-guin%C3%A9e-se-dote-d-une-loi-pour-la-d%C3%A9fense-des-personnes-atteintes-d-albinisme/5856305.html (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

72. Mediaguinée (n 44).

73. Comité des droits de l’enfant ‘Rapport valant troisième à sixième rapports périodiques soumis par la Guinée en application de l’article 44 de la Convention, attendus en 2017’ - b) Budget, allocation et gestion de ressources CRC/C/GIN/3-6* (7 août 2018) 10 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/TreatyBodyExternal/countries.aspx?CountryCode=GIN&Lang=FR (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

74. Assemblée Nationale de Guinée ‘Conacry le 15 Mai 2018. L/2018/021/AN Loi portant Protection et Promotion des Personnes Handicapées En République de Guinée’ https://assembleeguinee.org/index.php/conakry-le-15-mai-2018-l2018021an-loi-portant-protection-et-promotion-des-personnes-handicapees-en (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

75. Constitution de la République de Guinée, XVI, mars 2020, https://guilaw.com/la-constitution-de-2020/ (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).

76. Assemblée Nationale de Guinée (n 75).

77. F Bangoura ‘Boké-société: Une Conférence-débat pour vulgariser la Loi L021 portant protection et promotion des personnes handicapées’ Kamsarguinée.com 26 mars 2021 https://kamsarguinee.com/2021/03/26/boke-societe-une-conference-debat-pour-vulgariser-la-loi-l021-portant-protection-et-promotion-des-personnes-handicapees/ (consulté le 22 septembre 2021).


  • GEK Kamga ‘Country report: Algeria’ (2021) 9 African Disability Rights Yearbook 189-211
  •  http://doi.org/10.29053/2413-7138/2021/v9a9
  • Download article in PDF

Summary

As of 1 January 2020 the population of Algeria reached 43.9 million persons. In terms of disability, the country has about 2 million persons living with disabilities; 44 per cent comprise physical disabilities and represent the majority of disabilities in the country.

The Republic of Algeria signed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in 2009 but had already enacted law no 02/09 of 8 May 2002 pertaining to the protection and promotion of persons with disabilities. One should keep in mind that this law was enacted in 2002 prior to the CRPD that came into being in 2006. In addition, the government of Algeria set up a number of bodies to deal with disability issues in the country. These include, amongst others, the Commission Nationale d’Accessibilité des Personnes Handicapées à l’Environnement Physique, Social, Economique et Culturel; and the Conseil National des Personnes Handicapées. Similarly, there is a Commission Nationale de Promotion et de Protection des Droits de l’Homme (National Commission for the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights) established by law no 16/13 of 3 November 2016. In the same vein, a number of organisations, such as the Algerian Federation of People with Disabilities (Fédération Algérienne de Personnes Handicapées (FAPH)) exists to promote and protect disability rights.

Nonetheless, despite a comprehensive set of structures, legislation, initiatives and instruments promoting and protecting their rights, people with disabilities in Algeria are still confronted with various challenges including, amongst others, discrimination and stigmatisation.

1 Les indicateurs démographiques

1.1 Quelle est la population totale d’Algérie?

En Janvier 2020, le Ministre de l’Intérieur, des Collectivités Locales et de l’Aménagement du territoire, indiquait que ‘toutes les mesures nécessaires’ avaient été prises pour la réalisation courant 2021 du 6e recensement général de la population et de l’habitat (RGPH), et ce ‘si la situation sanitaire s’y prête’.1 Néanmoins, il convient de retenir que la population totale d’Algérie est passée de 43.9 millions le 1er Janvier 2020 contre 43.4 millions le 1er Janvier 2019.2

1.2 Méthodologie employée en vue d’obtenir des données statistiques sur la prévalence du handicap en Algérie. Quels sont les critères utilisés pour déterminer qui fait partie de la couche des personnes handicapées en Algérie?

En Algérie, la loi no 02/09 du 8 mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées avait jeté les bases d’une véritable protection de cette catégorie de personnes. Il est prévue au terme des dispositions de l’article 2 de cette loi que:

la protection et la promotion des personnes handicapées s’étendent, au sens de la présente loi, à toute personne, quels qu’en soient l’âge et le sexe, souffrant d’un ou de plusieurs handicaps d’origine héréditaire, congénitale ou acquis, et limitée dans l’exercice d’une ou de plusieurs activités de base de la vie courante personnelle et sociale, consécutivement à une atteinte de ses fonctions mentales et/ou motrices et/ou organiques sensorielles.

Il est ensuite prévu que ces handicaps seront définis suivant leur nature et leur degré par voie réglementaire.

1.3 Quel est le nombre total et le pourcentage des personnes handicapées en République d’Algérie ?

Parlant du nombre total et du pourcentage des personnes handicapées en Algérie, l’Office National des Statistiques renseigne que le pays dénombre environ 2 millions de personnes en situation de handicap. Il est précisé que le handicap moteur est le plus important, soit 44 pour cent des personnes handicapeés, suivi du handicap lié à la compréhension et la communication qui est de 32 pour cent et du handicap visuel qui s’élève à 24 pour cent.3

1.4 Quel est le nombre total et le pourcentage des femmes handicapées en République d’Algérie?

La réponse à cette question n’est pas précise. Toutefois, la ministre de la solidarité nationale, de la Famille et de la Condition de la Femme a récemment affirmé, que ‘le nombre effectif des personnes aux besoins spécifiques en Algérie sera fixé au prochain recensement de la population en 2020.’ En effet, invitée à un forum à la Radio nationale, la ministre a fait savoir que le nombre de personnes aux besoins spécifiques en Algérie s’élevait à un million de personnes titulaires d’une carte d’handicap. La ministre a toutefois estimée que la réalité dépasse largement ce chiffre.4

1.5 Quel est le nombre total et le pourcentage des enfants handicapés en République d’Algérie?

Les statistiques ne sont pas précises. Néanmoins, il a été indiqué que l’Algérie comptait environ deux millions de personnes handicapées et que le recensement national de 2018, dès que ses résultats seront connus, permettrait de disposer de chiffres plus précis.  Dans le même ordre d’idées, il est rappelé que plus de 900 000 personnes en Algérie sont détentrices d’une carte légitimant leur statut de personnes handicapées.5  

1.6 Quelles sont les formes de handicap les plus répandues en République d’Algérie?

Il ressort d’une enquête nationale à indicateurs multiples réalisée sur un échantillon de ménages algériens des différentes régions du pays qu’en Algérie, le handicap moteur arrive en tête des handicaps recensés avec. Le handicap lié à la compréhension et à la communication se classe à la deuxième position avec une prévalence de 32 pour cent suivi du handicap visuel, 24 pour cent et du handicap de l’ouïe, 0.4 pour cent. Il est indiqué que 2.5 pour cent des sondés souffrent d’un handicap qui diminue leurs activités quotidiennes; une prévalence qui passe de 0.1 pour cent chez les personnes de moins de 20 ans à 2.8 pour cent chez les 20-59 ans, puis à 13.2 pour cent chez les 60 ans et plus.6 Il ressort également de l’enquête que les sujets de sexe masculin sont plus touchés que ceux de sexe féminin, soit 3.9 pour cent contre 1.1 pour cent respectivement.

L’analyse selon la cause du handicap montre que 28.5 pour cent sont des atteintes congénitales ou héréditaires, 16.7 pour cent des séquelles des accidents ou de blessures, 14.2 pour cent des maladies infectieuses, 12.5 pour cent des effets de vieillesse, 7.9 pour cent des violences psychologiques ou physiques et 2 pour cent des traumatismes d’accouchement.7 La répartition par âge du taux de population souffrant d’un handicap congénital montre que chez les personnes âgées de 0 à 19 ans, ce type de handicap atteint 65 pour cent, alors qu’il est de 34.1 pour cent chez la population âgée de 20 à 59 ans et de plus de 18 pour cent chez les 60 ans et plus. L’enquête n’a enregistré aucune différence par sexe. Le handicap lié aux accidents et aux blessures atteint 17.5 pour cent dans la tranche d’âge 60 ans et plus, 16.7 pour cent chez les 20-59 ans et 3.5 pour cent chez les 0-19 ans, souligne l’enquête qui précise que les hommes sont sensiblement plus touchés par ce type de handicap que les femmes. L’examen de l’âge lié au handicap montre que plus de 25 pour cent des handicaps remontent à la naissance, plus de 11 pour cent à la petite enfance (moins de 5 ans), plus de 15 pour cent à la période allant de 5 à 18 ans et plus de 41 pour cent à la période de 19 ans et plus. Pour plus du tiers (37 pour cent) des handicaps, l’âge déclaré se situe entre la naissance et 5 ans. L’enquête révèle une forte présence des handicapés à l’âge de 19 ans et plus au centre (45.2 pour cent) et au sud (33.2 pour cent). Réalisée sur un échantillon de près de 30 000 ménages algériens des différentes régions du pays, l’enquête nationale à indicateurs multiples a notamment porté sur les maladies chroniques et handicaps, la santé maternelle, la santé des enfants et l’éducation.

2 Obligations internationales

2.1 Quel est le statut de la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées (CDPH) en République d’Algérie? La République d’Algérie a-t-elle signé et ratifié la CDPH? Fournir le(s) date(s). La République d’Algérie a-t-elle signé et ratifié le Protocole facultatif? Fournir le(s) date(s).

Le gouvernement Algérien a signé la Convention relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées le 30 Mars 2007 et l’a ratifié le 4 Décembre 2009. L’État Algérien n’a pas ratifié le Protocole facultatif se rapportant à la Convention.8

2.2 Si la République d’Algérie a signé et ratifié la CDPH, quel est/était le délai de soumission de son rapport? Quelle branche du gouvernement est responsable de la soumission du rapport? La République d’Algérie a-t-elle soumis son rapport? Sinon quelles sont les raisons du retard telles qu’avancées par la branche gouvernementale en charge?

Conformément à l’Article 35 de la CDPH, la République d’Algérie était tenue de soumettre son rapport initial dans un délai de deux ans, soit à la date du 4 Décembre 2011 compte tenu du fait que c’est le 4 Décembre 2009 que le pays a ratifié la CDPH. Le gouvernement Algérien a soumis son rapport initial au comité des droits des personnes handicapées en 2015. Il incombe au Ministère de la solidarité nationale, de la famille et de la condition féminine de soumettre le rapport.

2.3 Si la République d’Algérie a soumis le rapport au 2.2 et si le comité en charge des droits des personnes handicapées avait examiné le rapport, veuillez indiquer si le comité avait émis des observations finales et des recommandations au sujet du rapport de la République d’Algérie. Y’avait-il des effets internes découlant du processus de rapport liés aux questions handicapées d’Algérie?

Comme précédemment mentionné, l’Algérie a soumis son rapport initial en 2015 et après examen, le comité a émis des observations finales et recommandations suivantes:

Le Comité a relevé la non-ratification du Protocole facultatif se rapportant à la Convention par l’état Algérien. En guise de recommandation, l’État partie a été prié de remédier à cela. En outre, le Comité a également observé que L’Algérie n’a pas encore harmonisé sa législation avec la Convention, notamment sa loi no 02/09 du 8 mai 2002 et son décret exécutif no 14/204 du 15 juillet 2014, qui reposent essentiellement sur le modèle médical du handicap. Le comité a également observé que les différents niveaux d’évaluation du handicap aux fins de l’octroi de prestations et d’autres services continuent d’être axés sur les déficiences.9

En guise de recommandations, le Comité a suggéré à l’État Algérien:

  • D’incorporer pleinement la Convention dans son ordre juridique interne, d ’ abroger ou de modifier toute loi contraire à la Convention et discriminatoire à l ’ égard des personnes handicapées, notamment la loi no 02/09 du 8 mai 2002, et d ’ harmoniser ses politiques et pratiques avec la Convention;
  • D’éliminer les multiples niveaux d’évaluation du handicap et, en consultation avec les organisations de personnes handicapées, de mettre en place une politique et une procédure d’évaluation conformes à l’approche du handicap fondée sur les droits de l ’ homme qui est consacrée par la Convention.10

Par ailleurs, Il y a eu des effets internes découlant du processus de rapport liés aux questions des personnes handicapées en Algérie. Ainsi, la délégation Algérienne qui présentait son rapport initial a observé que le pays avait adopté sa loi relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées en 2002, avant même la ratification de la Convention. Cette délégation a également observé que le budget alloué aux activités publiques en faveur des personnes handicapées est de 138.5 milliards de dinars Algériens en 2018 (1 007 milliard d’euros). En plus, la délégation a fait valoir qu’un tiers du produit intérieur brut (PIB) de l’Algérie était consacré aux transferts de solidarité, en particulier en direction des personnes handicapées.11  

2.4 En établissant un rapport sous divers autres instruments des Nations Unies, la Charte Africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples ou la Charte Africaine relative aux Droits et au bien-être de l’Enfant, la République d’Algérie a-t-elle également fait mention spécifique du droit des personnes handicapées dans ses rapports les plus récents? Si oui, les observations finales adoptées par les organes statutaires ont-elles fait mention du handicap? Si pertinent, ces observations ont-elles été suivies d’effet? Etait-il fait mention des droits des handicapés dans le rapport de la Revue Périodique Universelle (RPU) des Nations Unies de la République d’Algérie? Si oui, quels étaient les effets de ces observations ou recommandations?

La République d’Algérie a effectivement fait mention spécifique du droit des personnes handicapées dans ses rapports les plus récents. Ainsi on retrouve plusieurs références dans les cinquième et sixième rapports périodiques de l’Algérie sur la mise en œuvre de la Charte Africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples couvrant la période 2010-2014, présenté en vertu de l’article 62 de ladite Charte. Dans la troisième partie de ce rapport intitulée « informations portant sur la mise en œuvre par l’Algérie de la Charte Africaine », l’article 18 est dévolue au droit de la famille, des femmes et des personnes âgées ou handicapées à des mesures spécifiques de protection.12 En outre, en ce qui est de la Revue Périodique Universelle des Nations Unies, le Rapport de l’Etat d’Algérie présenté conformément au paragraphe 5 de l’annexe à la résolution 16/21 du Conseil des droits de l’homme fait mention spécifique du droit des personnes handicapées. Ainsi, le paragraphe 186 de ce rapport dispose que « l’ensemble des administrations publiques accordent une attention particulière aux personnes à besoins spécifiques en leur offrant une assistance particulière qui se décline à travers la réalisation de rampes d’accès pour les handicapés moteurs, la signalisation d’un guichet spécifique destiné à accueillir les personnes vulnérables, la formation des personnels au langage gestuel et la réalisation de manuels scolaires destinés à informer les illettrés, sur leurs droits. » Plusieurs autres fragments a l’instar des paragraphes 12, 65, 96, 147, 149, 150, 160 de ce rapport font référence aux droits des personnes handicapées.13

Après l’examen des divers rapports, Il y a eu des observations ou recommandations qui ont été suivi d’effets. Le plus important demeure l’adoption de la loi no 02/09 du 8 mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées; une loi adoptée avant la ratification par le pays de la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux droits des personnes handicapées.

2.5 Y avait-il un quelconque effet interne sur le système légal de la République d’Algérie après la ratification de l’instrument international ou régional au 2.4 ci-dessus?

La ratification de la Convention Relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées, par l’Algérie a eu pour effet, la reconnaissance internationale des droits des personnes handicapées dans le pays. Ceci se traduit concrètement par le fait qu’en Algérie, les enfants handicapés, filles comme garçons, bénéficient désormais du droit à l’éducation pour tous dans des conditions d’égalité. Ce faisant, l’Algérie œuvre pour intégrer les enfants ayant des besoins spécifiques dans les salles de classe. Cet ainsi que plus de 32 000 d’entre eux sont désormais intégrés dans les classes ordinaires et plusieurs milliers d’autres sont intégrés partiellement, moyennant des soutiens spécialisés.14  

2.6 Les traités internationaux ratifiés deviennent-ils automatiquement loi nationale sous votre système légal? Si oui y a-t-il des cas où les cours et tribunaux appliquent directement les dispositions du traité international?

En vertu des dispositions de l’article 154 de la constitution Algérienne, les traités ratifiés par le Président de la République, dans les conditions fixées par la Constitution, sont supérieurs à la loi. Tenant compte de cette disposition constitutionnelle, l’on peut logiquement envisager que les cours et tribunaux d’Algérie peuvent directement appliquer les dispositions du traité international bien qu’il n’y ait pas d’exemple disponible.

2.7 En référence au 2.4 ci-dessus, la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées CDPH ou tout autre instrument international ratifié, en tout ou en partie, a-t-il été incorporé textuellement dans la législation nationale? Fournir les détails.

Si l’on considère qu’en Algérie, les traités ratifiés par le Président de la République, dans les conditions fixées par la Constitution sont supérieurs à la loi comme mentionné à l’article 54, il en découle logiquement qu’en ratifiant la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées CDPH en 2009, le gouvernement Algérien incorporait cette Convention dans la législation nationale.

3 Constitution

3.1 La constitution de la République d’Algérie contient-elle des dispositions concernant directement le handicap? Si oui énumérez les dispositions et expliquez comment chacune d’elles traite du handicap.

La Constitution Algérienne de 1996 révisée en 2020 contient des dispositions directement relatives au handicap. Ainsi, l’article 72 prévoit que L’Etat œuvre à assurer aux personnes vulnérables ayant des besoins spécifiques, leur insertion dans la vie sociale. Dans le même ordre d’idées, l’article 37 mentionne que les citoyens sont égaux devant la loi et ont droit à une égale protection de celle-ci, sans que puisse prévaloir aucune discrimination pour cause de naissance, de race, de sexe, d’opinion ou de toute autre condition ou circonstance personnelle ou sociale. En outre, l’article 35 sur les droits fondamentaux et les libertés garantis par l’Etat, souligne que les institutions de la République ont pour finalité d’assurer l’égalité en droits et en devoirs de tous les citoyens et citoyennes en supprimant les obstacles qui entravent l’épanouissement de la personne humaine et empêchent la participation effective de tous à la vie politique, économique, sociale et culturelle. Une telle disposition fait également référence aux personnes handicapées.

3.2 La constitution de la République d’Algérie contient-elle des dispositions concernant indirectement le handicap? Si oui énumérez les dispositions et expliquez comment chacune d’elles traite indirectement du handicap.

La Constitution d’Algérie réitère dans son préambule l’attachement du peuple algérien aux Droits de l’Homme tels qu’ils sont définis dans la Déclaration universelle des Droits de l’Homme de 1948 et les traités internationaux ratifiés par l’Algérie. Cette disposition concerne indirectement le handicap tant il est vrai que les textes mentionnés ainsi que la notion de droit de l’homme s’appliquent également aux personnes handicapées. En ce qui sont des traités ratifiés par l’Algérie, la Convention relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées ratifiée par le pays en 2009 est un exemple palpable.

4 Législation

4.1 La République d’Algérie a-t-elle une législation concernant directement le handicap? Si oui énumérez la législation et expliquez comment la législation aborde le handicap.

Il existe effectivement en Algérie plusieurs textes concernant directement le handicap:

  • Loi no 02/09 du 8 mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées.
  • Décret exécutif no 17/187 du 3 juin 2017 fixant les modalités de prévention du handicap.
  • Décret exécutif no 14/214 du 30 juillet 2014 fixant les modalités inhérentes à la réservation des postes de travail, à la détermination de la contribution financière et à l’octroi de subventions pour l’aménagement et l’équipement des postes de travail pour les personnes handicapées.
  • Décret exécutif no 08/83 du 4 mars 2008 fixant les conditions de création, l’organisation et le fonctionnement des établissements de travail protégé.
  • Décret exécutif no 08/02 du 2 janvier 2008 fixant les conditions de création, l’organisation et le fonctionnement des établissement d’aide par le travail.
  • Décret exécutif no 06/455 du 11 décembre 2006 fixant les modalités d’accessibilité des personnes handicapées à l’environnement physique, social, économique et culturel.
  • Décret exécutif no 03/333 du 8 octobre 2003 relatif à la Commission de wilayas d’éducation spéciale et de formation professionnelle.
  • Décret exécutif no 03/45 du 19 janvier 2003 fixant les modalités d’application des dispositions de l’article 7 de la loi no 02-09 du 8 mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées.
  • Décret exécutif no 19/273 du 8 octobre 2019 modifiant le décret exécutif no 03-45 du 19 janvier 2003 fixant les modalités d’application des dispositions de l’article 7 de la loi no 02/09 du 8 mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées.
  • Décret exécutif no 05/68 du 30 janvier 2005 fixant le statut type des centres de formation professionnelle et d’apprentissage spécialisés pour personnes handicapées physiques.
4.2 La République d’Algérie a-t-elle une législation concernant indirectement le handicap? Si oui énumérez la principale législation et expliquez comment elle réfère au handicap.

On peut dire qu’en Algérie, toute législation est guidée par le principe de l’égalité de tous les citoyens devant la loi y compris les personnes handicapées. Comme précédemment mentionné, le préambule de la Constitution Algérienne réitère son attachement aux Droits de l’Homme tels qu’ils sont définis dans la Déclaration universelle des Droits de l’Homme de 1948 et les traités internationaux ratifiés par l’Algérie.

5 Décisions des cours et tribunaux

5.1 Les cours (ou tribunaux) de la République d’Algérie ont-ils jamais statué sur une question(s) relative au handicap? Si oui énumérez le cas et fournir un résumé pour chacun des cas en indiquant quels étaient les faits; la (les) décision(s), la démarche et l’impact (le cas échéant) que ces cas avaient entrainés.

Information non disponible.

6 Politiques et programmes

6.1 La République d’Algérie a-t-elle des politiques ou programmes qui englobent directement le handicap? Si oui énumérez la politique et expliquez comment cette politique aborde le handicap.

L’on peut retenir qu’en Algérie, les politiques ou programmes qui englobent directement le handicap sont conçus par le Ministère de la Solidarité Nationale, de la Famille et de la Condition de la Femme, à qui incombe cette responsabilité. Une fois élaborées, ce Ministère a également la responsabilité de la mise en œuvre et du suivi de ces politiques, en collaboration avec les parties prenantes. Lors de la présentation de son rapport initial sur les mesures prises pour appliquer les dispositions de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées devant le Comité des droits des personnes handicapées, l’Algérie a souligné que les politiques publiques veillent à assurer l’accès de toutes les personnes aux bâtiments publics, notamment les bâtiments judiciaires, où les justiciables handicapés bénéficient d’aménagements tels que des systèmes de traduction des jugements en braille, a ajouté la délégation.15 La délégation Algérienne a également expliqué que la commission nationale d’accessibilité des personnes handicapées était dotée de trois sous-comités chargés respectivement des transports, des espaces et bâtiments publics, de la communication et de la technologie. Ainsi, il a été adopté une politique pour le logement des personnes handicapées, dont une des mesures consiste à leur réserver des logements au rez-de-chaussée.  Au cours de cette présentation, il a également été mentionné le lancement d’un programme d’aménagement et d’équipement des plages ainsi que la collecte d’informations nécessaires pour la rédaction d’un dictionnaire de la langue des signes algérienne.16 La délégation a en outre présenté d’autres mesures prises par les autorités en faveur de l’accès des personnes handicapées aux services publics. C’est dans ce contexte que le Ministère de l’éducation a rénové et équipé de nombreux ateliers, dortoirs et salles de classe pour les rendre accessibles aux étudiants handicapés.  Dans le même ordre d’idées, le Ministère de la culture a réhabilité quelque 155 bibliothèques, ainsi que des théâtres et des cinémas.  Il a été ensuite expliqué qu’en Algérie, l’évaluation du handicap se faisait, par des commissions composées de médecins spécialisés qui appliquent des critères uniquement médicaux conformes aux normes de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé.  Chaque demande de prestation pour personne handicapée est évaluée en fonction d’un barème de référence.17  

6.2 La République d’Algérie a-t-elle des politiques ou programmes qui englobent indirectement le handicap? Si oui énumérez chaque politique et décrivez comment elle aborde indirectement le handicap.

La République d’Algérie a effectivement des politiques ou programmes qui englobent indirectement le handicap. Conformément au décret no 13/134 du 10 avril 2013 fixant les attributions du Ministre de la Solidarité Nationale, de la Famille et de la Condition de la Femme, ce ministère a les prérogatives suivantes:

  • Proposer et mettre en œuvre, en relation avec les secteurs concernés, des programmes d’action visant à protéger et à promouvoir la famille, la femme, la personne âgée, l’enfant et l’adolescent, notamment ceux en difficulté sociale et/ou économique, ainsi que les programmes de solidarité envers les jeunes;
  • Concevoir et mettre en œuvre la politique et la stratégie nationale de protection et de promotion de la famille, dans un cadre intersectoriel;
  • Proposer la stratégie nationale de protection et de promotion des personnes handicapées, dans une vision intersectorielle;
  • Concevoir les programmes de développement social et coordonner leur mise en œuvre;
  • Proposer, mettre en œuvre et contrôler la mise en place des mécanismes et instruments visant la lutte contre la pauvreté, l’exclusion et la marginalisation et la réduction de la précarité sociale, favorisant ainsi la préservation et la consolidation de la cohésion sociale;
  • Identifier et mettre en œuvre, en relation avec les institutions de l’Etat, les secteurs concernés et le mouvement associatif, des programmes spécifiquement destinés aux catégories sociales en difficulté ou en situation de vulnérabilité;
  • Encourager la promotion et le développement du mouvement associatif à caractère humanitaire et social;
  • Contribuer à la mise en œuvre d’actions à caractère humanitaire et social initiées dans les situations de catastrophes, de calamités naturelles et d’urgence sociale;
  • Initier et mettre en place le système d’information et de communication relatif aux activités relevant de son domaine de compétence, en fixant les objectifs et établir les stratégies y afférentes;
  • Assurer la représentation du secteur aux activités déclinées par les organismes régionaux et internationaux ayant compétence dans le domaine de la solidarité nationale, de la famille, de la condition de la femme, de la personne âgée et de l’enfant ainsi que du développement social.18

De par la formulation de ces attributions et de par la catégorie des personnes dont elles visent, l’on peut logiquement en déduire que ces politiques concernent aussi bien les personnes non handicapées que celles handicapées.

7 Organismes handicapés

7.1 En dehors des cours ou tribunaux ordinaires, la République d’Algérie a-t-elle un organisme officiel qui s’intéresse spécifiquement à la violation des droits des personnes handicapées? Si oui décrire l’organe, ses fonctions et ses pouvoirs.

En dehors des cours ou tribunaux ordinaires, l’Algérie a effectivement mis en place d’autres organes qui s’intéressent spécifiquement à la violation des droits des personnes handicapées.

  • La Commission Nationale d’Accessibilité des Personnes Handicapées à l’Environnement Physique, Social, Economique et Culturel encadré par un décret pris en application des dispositions de l’article 30 de la loi no 02/09 du 25 Safar 1423 correspondant au 8 mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées. Cette instance a pour missions le suivi de la mise en œuvre, les programmes relatifs à l’accessibilité des personnes handicapées à l’environnement physique, social, économique et culturel. Parmi les objectifs de cette Commission, l’on doit mentionner l’évaluation de l’état d’avancement des programmes mis en œuvre et les propositions et mesures susceptible d’améliorer l’accessibilité les personnes handicapées à la vie sociale. Les membres de cette commission sont nommés par le ministre chargé de le solidarité nationale pour une durée de 3 années renouvelable. La commission est divisée en trois sous-ensembles chargées respectivement de l’accessibilité à l’environnement de l’accessibilité aux infrastructures et aux moyens de transport et de l’accessibilité aux moyens de communication et d’information. Les rapports de ces sous commissions ensuite soumis à l’examen de la commission nationale en séance plénière afin d’établir un programme de travail, et un rapport annuel sur l’accessibilité les personnes handicapées.19
  • Le Conseil National des Personnes Handicapées, qui est un organe mis sur pied par décret exécutif no 06/145 du 26 Avril 2006 fixant la composition, les modalités de fonctionnement et les attributions. Au terme des dispositions de l’article 2 de ce décret, le Conseil est un organe consultatif chargé d’étudier et de donner son avis sur toutes les questions relatives à la protection, à la promotion, à l’insertion socio-professionnelle et à l’intégration des personnes handicapées. En ce qui est de ses missions, le même article 2 stipule que le conseil est chargé d’étudier et de proposer notamment:
  • Les méthodes et mécanismes d’identification et de maitrise de l’évolution de la population handicapée par nature de handicap;
  • Les programmes d’actions de solidarité nationale et d’insertion socio-professionnelle à mener en faveur des personnes handicapées;
  • Les techniques et modalités de normalisation et de standardisation des équipements et appareillages destinées aux personnes handicapées;
  • Les aménagements des postes de travail destinés à faciliter l’intégration des personnes handicapées en milieu professionnel;
  • Les aménagements destinés à faciliter le cadre de vie et le bien-être des personnes handicapées, notamment en matière de transport, d’habitation et d’accessibilité des lieux publics;
  • Les programmes de prévention planifiés et intégrés du handicap par l’information, la sensibilisation et la communication sociale en direction des personnes handicapées,
  • Les perspectives de développement coordonnés de la politique de solidarité nationale en faveur des personnes handicapées;
  • Le conseil est chargé également d’étudier et de donner son avis sur les avant-projets de textes législatifs et règlementaires en faveur de la protection et de la promotion des personnes handicapées.

Aux termes des dispositions de l’article 4, les membres du conseil sont désignés par arrêté du ministre chargé de la solidarité nationale, pour une durée de trois (3) ans, renouvelable. D’un autre côté, comme mentionné à l’article 8, le conseil élabore annuellement un rapport inhérent à ses activités et à l’évaluation de la politique de protection, de promotion, d’insertion socio-professionnelle et d’intégration des personnes handicapées qu’il soumet au ministre chargé de la solidarité nationale.

7.2 En dehors des cours ou tribunaux ordinaires, la République d’Algérie a-t-elle un organisme officiel qui, bien que n’étant pas spécifiquement en charge de la violation des droits des personnes handicapées s’y attèle tout de même? Si oui décrire l’organe, ses fonctions et ses pouvoirs.

Information non-disponible.

8 Institutions Nationales des Droits de l’Homme (Commission des Droits de l’Homme ou Oumbudsman ou Protecteur du Citoyen)

8.1 La République d’Algérie est-elle doté d’une Commission de Droits de l’Homme ou d’un Ombudsman ou d’un Protecteur du Citoyen? Si oui ses missions incluent-elles la promotion et la protection des droits des personnes handicapées? Si votre réponse est oui, indiquez également si la Commission de Droits de l’Homme ou l’Ombudsman ou le Protecteur du Citoyen de la République d’Algérie a jamais abordé des questions relatives aux droits des personnes handicapées.

En Algérie, il existe une Commission Nationale de Promotion et de Protection des Droits de l’Homme créée par le loi no 16/13 du 3 Safar 1438 correspondant au 3 novembre 2016 fixant la composition et les modalités de désignation des membres du Conseil National des Droits de l’Homme ainsi que les règles relatives à son organisation et à son fonctionnement. Comme indiqué à l’article 2 de la loi susmentionnée, la commission est un organisme indépendant qui œuvre à la promotion et à la protection des droits de l’Homme. Etant entendu que ces droits inclus également ceux des personnes handicapées, l’on peut donc logiquement conclure que les missions de la Commission Nationale de Promotion et de Protection des Droits de l’Homme incluent la protection des droits des personnes handicapées. Quant à savoir si la Commission Nationale de Promotion et de Protection des Droits de l’Homme a jamais abordé des questions relatives aux droits des personnes handicapées, cette information est indisponible.

9 Organsation des personnes handicapées (OPH) et autres Organisations de la Société Civile

9.1 Avez-vous en République d’Algérie des organisations qui représentent et défendent les droits et le bien-être des personnes handicapées? Si oui énumérez chaque organisation et décrivez ses activités.

Il y’a effectivement en Algérie, des organisations qui représentent et défendent les droits et le bien-être des personnes en situation handicapées. Il s’agit par exemple de:

  • L’association Nationale de Soutien aux Personnes Handicapées, El Baraka.

Cette association est reconnue par le ministère de l’intérieur et des collectivités locales notamment par un agrément sous le numéro 22 délivré le 22 décembre 2002 suivis de la conformité sous le no 47 datée du 24 juin 2014 lui accordant la possibilité d’intervenir sur l’ensemble du territoire national.20

En guise the mission, El Baraka se veut être un moyen au service des personnes handicapées:

  • Par la diffusion de la réglementation en vigueur relative à la personne handicapée, en veillant à son application et à son amélioration;
  • Par la lutte contre toute discrimination, marginalisation ou traitement avilissant nuisant au bien-être de la personne handicapée;
  • Par l’écoute, l’orientation et l’accompagnement pour la quête de l’autonomie et l’élaboration de projet de vie pour les personnes handicapées;
  • La mise en place et la participation aux campagnes, d’éducation, de sensibilisations, d’informations et de préventions visant à réduire les causes invalidantes;
  • Par des plaidoyers permettant l’adaptation de l’environnement aux personnes handicapées;
  • Par la création et/ou la gestion de centres d’accueil, de sports, de loisirs, de cultures, de rééducation fonctionnelle ou toutes autres structures pouvant être une source d’intérêt pour la personne handicapée;
  • Par la mise en action de programmes de parrainages.21
9.2 Dans votre région, les OPH sont-elles organisées ou coordonnées au niveau national et/ou régional?

En Algérie, il existe La Fédération Algérienne des Personnes Handicapées (FAPH) qui se veut un mouvement national militant pour la défense et la promotion des droits et pour une citoyenneté des personnes handicapées à égalité de chances. La FAPH a mis également  en place un groupe de travail constitué  de la  Fédération des  Sourds, fédération des parents d’enfants inadaptés mentaux, l’association des éducateurs spécialisés pour non-voyants, association entraide populaire familiale, pour l’élaboration  d’un rapport alternatif mettant  en exergue les difficultés rencontrées  par les personnes Handicapées et faire des propositions pour  améliorer leur situation.22

En dehors de la FAPH, on dénombre plusieurs autres OPH en Algérie organisées ou coordonnées au niveau national et/ou régional. Il s’agit de:

  • Association Culturelle et d’Insertion des Handicapés Moteurs de la wilaya de Bechar;
  • Association Nationale de Soutien aux Personnes Handicapées El Baraka;
  • DEFI contre les Myopathies Bejaia;
  • DEFI Seddouk: Association pour Enfants Inadaptés Mentaux;
  • Défis et espoir des personnes en situation de handicap de Jijel;
  • Réseau Algérien pour la Défense des Droits des Personnes Handicapées.
9.3 Si la République d’Algérie a ratifié la CDPH, comment a-t-elle assuré l’implication des Organisations des personnes handicapées dans le processus de mise en œuvre?

Il est à noter que la République d’Algérie a mis en place un Conseil National des Personnes Handicapées, par décret exécutif no 06/145 du 256 avril 2006; Conseil ayant effectivement été installé en 2014. Aux termes des dispositions du décret susmentionné, ce Conseil est chargé, d’étudier et de proposer des programmes d’action de solidarité nationale et d’insertion socioprofessionnelle à mener en faveur des personnes handicapées, ainsi que de donner son avis sur les avant-projets de textes législatifs et réglementaires en faveur de la protection et de la promotion des personnes handicapées. Le Conseil est composé de représentants des départements ministériels et institutions publiques concernées, de représentants des associations nationales des personnes handicapées et de représentants de parents d’enfants et d’adolescents handicapés.23

9.4 Quels genres d’actions les OPH ont-elles prise elles-mêmes afin de s’assurer qu’elles soient pleinement intégrées dans le processus de mise en œuvre?

L’on peut mentionner que la Fédération Algérienne des Personnes Handicapées (FAPH) travail sur des projets pilotes ayant valeur de référence avec comme objectif leur appropriation par les pouvoirs publics, les réseaux de la FAPH et les associations des personnes handicapées affiliées à la FAPH. Ces projets sont menés en partenariat avec ses principaux partenaires, notamment les Pouvoirs Publics que sont le Ministère de la Solidarité de la Famille et de la Condition Féminine, le Ministère de la jeunesse et des sports et le Ministère de la Santé ainsi que les Collectivités locales sur tout le territoire national. 24

9.5 Quels sont, le cas échéant les obstacles rencontrés par les OPH lors de leur engagement dans la mise en œuvre?

De manière générale, les Organisations des Personnes Handicapées en Algérie ne disposent pas de ressources suffisantes pour leur fonctionnement et la mise en œuvre de leurs programmes. Tout ceci contribue à les ralentir dans l’accomplissement de leurs missions.

9.6 Y a-t-il des exemples pouvant servir de ‘modèles’ pour la participation des OPH?

Information non disponible.

9.7 Y a-t-il des résultats spécifiques concernant une mise en œuvre prospère et/ou une reconnaissance appropriée des droits des personnes handicapées résultant de l’implication des OPH dans le processus de mise en œuvre?

Information non disponible.

9.8 Votre recherche (pour ce projet) a-t-elle identifié des aspects qui nécessitent le développement de capacité et soutien pour les OPH afin d’assurer leur engagement dans la mise en œuvre de la Convention?

Nous croyons qu’il faille mettre une plus grande pression sur le gouvernement et les pouvoirs publics pour une plus grande promotion et protection des droits des personnes handicapées. Il faut également veiller à ce que les divers problèmes rencontrés aussi bien par les personnes handicapées que les OPH soient résolus.

9.9 Y a-t-il des recommandations provenant de votre recherche au sujet de comment les OPH pourraient être plus largement responsabilisées dans les processus de mise en œuvre des instruments internationaux ou régionaux?

Les OPH au travers de la Fédération Algérienne des Personnes Handicapées devraient se voir offrir plus de moyens financiers et matériels pour l’accomplissement de leurs missions de sensibilisation, représentation, éducation et conscientisation des masses. L’Etat Algérien devrait tenir compte de leur critiques et observations et devraient leur accorder une place plus importante.

9.10 Y a-t-il des instituts de recherche spécifiques dans votre région qui travaillent sur les droits des personnes handicapées et qui ont facilité l’implication des OPH dans le processus, y compris la recherche?

Bien que cela ne soit pas clairement défini, on estime néanmoins que certaines des organisations mentionnées à la question 9.2 ci-dessus devraient d’une façon ou d’une autre, directement ou indirectement travailler sur les droits des personnes handicapées et de ce fait contribuer à faciliter l’implication des OPH dans le processus, y compris la recherche.

10 Branches gouvernementales

10.1 Avez-vous de(s) branche(s) gouvernementale(s) spécifiquement chargée(s) de promouvoir et protéger les droits et le bien-être des personnes handicapées? Si oui, décrivez les activités de cette (ces) branche(s).

En Algérie, il incombe au Ministère de la Solidarité Nationale, de la Famille et de la condition féminine de promouvoir et protéger les droits et le bien-être des personnes handicapées, de la mise en œuvre et du suivi des politiques, en collaboration avec les parties prenantes conformément au décret no 13/134 du 10 avril 2013 fixant les attributions de ce département ministériel. Ses activités ont été décrit au point 6.1 ci-dessus. En plus de cet organe gouvernemental, l’on peut également mentionner la Commission Nationale d’Accessibilité des Personnes Handicapées à l’Environnement Physique, Social, Economique et Culturel encadré par un décret pris en application des dispositions de l’article 30 de la loi no 02/09 du 8 mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées. Cette Commission a pour mission la mise en œuvre des programmes relatifs à l’accessibilité des personnes handicapées à l’environnement physique, social, économique et culturel. Comme autre organe en charge de la promotion et de la protection des droits des personnes handicapées, il y’a le Conseil National des Personnes Handicapées, un organe encadré par le décret no 06/145 du 26 Avril 2006 fixant la composition, les modalités de fonctionnement et les attributions. C’est un organe consultatif chargé d’étudier et de donner son avis sur toutes les questions relatives à la protection, à la promotion, à l’insertion socio-professionnelle et à l’intégration des personnes handicapées. Ses missions sont mentionnées à l’article 2 du décret susmentionné; missions mentionnées au point 7.1 ci-dessus.

11 Préoccupations majeures des droits de l’homme relatives aux personnes handicapées

11.1 Quels sont les défis contemporains des personnes handicapées en République d’Algérie? (Exemple: Certaines régions d’Afrique pratiquent des tueries rituelles de certaines catégories de personnes handicapées telles que les personnes atteintes d’albinisme. A cet effet la Tanzanie est aux avant-postes. Nous devons remettre en cause les pratiques coutumières qui discriminent, blessent et tuent les personnes handicapées.

Les défis contemporains auxquels sont confrontés les personnes en situation de handicap en Algérie sont multiples. Au cours des entretiens, il ressort qu’il y’a manque de disponibilité et de qualité des appareillages fournis par l’Office National d’Appareillages et d’Accessoires pour Personnes Handicapées (ONAAPH), ce qui a un effet sur la qualité de vie des personnes handicapées.25 Comme autre obstacle identifié, le montant des allocations financières est insuffisant pour assurer une couverture des besoins fondamentaux des personnes handicapées à favoriser l’accès à une vie indépendante.26 En outre, mention est faite des lenteurs administratives qui compliquent l’accès aux services de soutien, du manque de sensibilité et de formation de quelques fonctionnaires quant aux questions liées à l’accueil des personnes handicapées dans les services.27 L’on dénote également l’absence d’une mise en application efficace des dispositions légales notamment celles relatives au quota pour le recrutement de travailleurs handicapés.28 En plus de ces obstacles, l’on doit noter l’insuffisance et/ou l’inadéquation des réponses existantes, soit au niveau de la prévention, soit au niveau de la prise en charge précoce et de l’accompagnement tout au long de la vie.29

11.2 Comment la République d’Algérie répond-t-elle aux besoins des personnes handicapées au regard des domaines ci-dessous énumérées?
  • Accès aux bâtiments publics

En Algérie, un décret exécutif no 06/455 du 11 décembre 2006 fixe les modalités d’accessibilité des personnes handicapées à l’environnement physique, social, économique et culturel. De même, une loi du 30 juin 2002 a établi le principe de l’accessibilité des locaux d’habitation neufs. Ce faisant, cette loi encadre les besoins des personnes handicapées en ce qui est de la conception des constructions, ouvrages publiques et privées, les transports et la voirie. Ainsi, le but est de rendre accessibles les infrastructures aux personnes à mobilité réduites notamment les personnes âgées handicapées en prévoyant:

  • L’aménagement de rampes douces;
  • L’aménagement au niveau des trottoirs et cheminement piétons;
  • La mise en place de bandes podotactiles pour les malvoyants depuis leur accès au bâtiment jusqu’à l’embarquement;
  • La réservation d’un guichet adapté propre aux personnes handicapées;
  • La réservation de sanitaires accessibles aux personnes handicapées;
  • La mise en place d’une signalétique adéquate propre aux personnes handicapées;
  • La réservation de places de stationnement aux personnes handicapées;
  • L’implantation des traverses en arrière des arrêts des Transports en Commun (TC).30

Néanmoins, la pratique démontre que les élèves et étudiants handicapés des écoles et centres de formation professionnelle ont encore du mal à accéder aux ouvrages publics/privés.

  • Accès au transport public

Parlant de l’accès au transport en Algérie, un certain nombre d’aménagements au profit des personnes handicapées a été réalisé notamment dans le domaine du Transport Urbain:

Pour le projet Métro:
  • Les dispositions prises pour la prise en charge des personnes à mobilité réduite (PMR) consistent en:
  • L’accès du quai vers la rame se fait directement (même niveau) pour permettre l’accessibilité aux PMR;
  • Des places réservées aux PMR au niveau des rames ont été prévues avec un espace dégagé pour permettre leur déplacement;
  • Des bandes podotactiles ont été réalisées au bord du quai pour signaler sa limite au PMR.31
Pour le projet Tramway:
  • Les quais sont totalement accessibles aux PMR;
  • Des places réservées aux PMR au niveau des rames ont été prévues avec un espace dégagé pour permettre leur déplacement;
  • Des bandes podotactiles ont été réalisées au bord du quai pour signaler sa limite aux PMR et les rampes d’accès vers le quai sont aussi équipées par ce même type de bande.32
Pour le transport par bus:
  • Depuis le 1er mars 2011, une circulaire a été diffusée aux organismes en charge du transport en commun, relative à la réservation de places à l’avant du véhicule avec une inscription « place réservée » aux personnes handicapées.
  • Des micros bus aménagés pour le transport des personnes handicapées seront affectés dans les hôpitaux spécialisés dans la rééducation fonctionnelle dans la wilaya d’Alger, et financé par la Société nationale pour la recherche, la production, le transport, la transformation et la commercialisation des hydrocarbures (SONATRACH);
  • Des bus spéciaux et aménagés dédiés au transport des personnes handicapées qui vont être affectés au niveau du parc de chaque nouvel établissement spécialisé.33

Au niveau des gares routières: La conception des infrastructures d’accueil et de traitement des voyageurs par route prend en charge l’adaptation de ce genre d’infrastructures aux personnes à mobilité réduite (PMR) qui inclut, outre les handicapés, les malvoyants les personnes âgées, circulant avec poussettes, femmes enceintes, et personnes en difficulté.34

  • Accès à l’éducation

En Algérie, la loi no 02/09 du 8 Mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées a pour priorité un enseignement obligatoire et une formation professionnelle pour les enfants et adolescents handicapés. Dans le même ordre d’idées, l’article 14 de la loi no 08/04 du 23 janvier 2008 sur l’éducation nationale contient des dispositions particulières aux enfants handicapés ayant des besoins spécifiques. Cette législation rend obligatoire la scolarisation des enfants de 6 à 16 ans et prolonge de deux ans cette période pour les élèves handicapés. La même législation prévoit également la prise en charge des élèves hospitalisés pour une longue durée dans des classes au sein des hôpitaux et centres hospitaliers et celles des enfants atteints d’une déficience sensorielle dans des classes intégrées. Par ailleurs, la loi no 15/12 du 15 juillet 2015 relative à la protection de l’enfant stipule que l’enfant handicapé « jouit du droit à la protection, aux soins, à l’enseignement et à la rééducation qui favorisent son autonomie et à sa participation effective à la vie économique, sociale et culturelle ». Enfin, l’arrêté interministériel du 17 mai 2003 fixe les modalités d’organisation de l’évaluation et des examens scolaires des élèves handicapés sensoriels.35

Toutefois, l’on doit également retenir que l’intégration des enfants handicapés dans le système en Algérie connait un certain nombre d’obstacles:

  • La persistance des attitudes négatives des directeurs et des enseignants envers les élèves en situation de handicap, qui estiment que ces élèves retardent la classe et ne disposent pas des capacités nécessaires pour suivre les cours;
  • Le manque de formation et de préparation spécifiques des enseignants pour accueillir les enfants en situation de handicap;
  • Les problèmes d’accessibilité;
  • Des difficultés structurelles, comme le manque de temps disponible pour se consacrer à chaque enfant, la surcharge des cours, le manque de matériels adaptés et d’accompagnateurs qui pourraient aider à mieux prendre en charge l’enfant en situation de handicap dans le système éducatif ordinaire sont aussi à prendre en compte.36
  • Accès à la formation professionnelle

Parlant de formation professionnelle des personnes handicapées, les informations sont difficilement accessibles. Mais il est à noter que le Bilan Consolidé du Ministère de la Formation Professionnelle de 2013 faisait état de 2.062 personnes fréquentant des cours de formation, dont 1.209 en formation résidentielle et 853 en formation par apprentissage (réalisée en alternance entre les établissements de formation et les entreprises, artisans et organismes publics où se déroule la formation pratique). Dans le même ordre d’idées, plusieurs instruments législatifs prévoient l’exonération ou la réduction de taxes et d’impôts comme aide à l’intégration socioprofessionnelle des personnes en situation de handicap.37

  • Accès à l’emploi

Dans le même ordre d’idées, en matière d’emploi, le gouvernement a mis sur pied des dispositifs pour encourager la formation et l’inclusion professionnelle des personnes en situation de handicap. Il existe de ce fait des mécanismes de soutien aux formes de travail adaptées ou des avantages fiscaux pour les travailleurs en situation de handicap ainsi que pour les entreprises créées par des organisations de personnes en situation de handicap agréées.38 L’article 27 de la loi no 02/09 du 8 Mai 2002 sur la protection et la promotion des personnes handicapées prévoit pour tout employeur l’obligation de consacrer 1% des postes de travail aux personnes en situation de handicap dont la qualité de travailleur est reconnue.

  • Accès à la détente et au sport

En Algérie, il existe une Fédération algérienne handisport (FAH) qui regroupe les athlètes handisports. Généralement, la journée du 3 décembre est célébrée par des festivités organisées sous l’égide de la Fédération algérienne handisport (FAH).

  • Accès aux soins de santé

En Algérie, l’accès aux soins de santé a été fortement développé de telle sorte que les personnes handicapées et celles âgées semblent bénéficier de soins de qualité. Ainsi:

  • L’accès est gratuit aux structures sanitaires publiques et les personnes handicapées bénéficient de l’ensemble des prestations médicales prévues pour la population générale ainsi qu’aux services spécifiques de rééducation et de réadaptation qui se développent pour répondre aux besoins spécifiques des personnes handicapées;
  • L’adoption de modes d’organisation de l’offre de soins visant à réduire les disparités territoriales avec le développement des structures de proximité (polycliniques et salles de soins) et des soins primaires de proximité notamment en milieu rural et dans les zones enclavées en relation avec les structures hospitalières pour assurer la continuité des soins;
  • La formation initiale et continue des intervenants demeure un levier important pour améliorer la qualité de prise en charge sanitaire et un effort est consenti pour renforcer les effectifs des personnels de santé et l’ouverture de nouvelles filières notamment dans le domaine de la réadaptation;
  • Les soins aux catégories vulnérables sont prioritaires et les moyens de leur prise en charge sont assurés pour dispenser des prestations adaptées. La discrimination est contre les principes d’éthique et de déontologie qui ont été consacrés par des législations;
  • l’ouverture du centre national d’études, d’information et de documentation sur la famille, la femme et l’enfant, créé par décret no10/155 du 20 juin 2012, dont ses missions s’articulent autour des études, l’exploitation des enquêtes, la collecte des données, la constitution d’une banque de données liées aux domaines de la famille, de la femme et de l’enfance et du handicap.39

Dans le même ordre d’idées, les personnes handicapées qui n’exercent aucune activité professionnelle sont considérées comme assurées sociales et donc bénéficient des mêmes prestations en nature de l’assurance maladie que les assurés sociaux valides. En plus des soins de santé, les personnes handicapées bénéficient de la gratuité des produits d’appareillage fournis par l’Office National d’Appareillages et d’Accessoires pour Personnes Handicapées (ONAAPH). Toutefois il n’en demeure pas moins qu’il y’a manque de disponibilité et de qualité des appareillages fournis par l’ONAAPH, ce qui a un effet sur la qualité de vie des personnes handicapées.40

11.3 La République d’Algérie accorde-t-elle des subventions pour handicap ou autre moyen de revenue en vue de soutenir les personnes handicapées?

Il existe en Algérie une panoplie de texte visant à soutenir financièrement les personnes handicapées. Ces textes sont:

  • Le décret no 03/45 du 19 janvier 2003 fixant les modalités d’application des dispositions de l’article 7 de la loi no 02-09 du 8 mai 2002 relative à la protection et à la promotion des personnes handicapées, modifié;
  • Le décret exécutif no 03/175 du 14 avril 2003 relatif à la commission médicale spécialisée de wilaya et à la commission nationale de recours;
  • Le décret exécutif no 06/144 du 26 avril 2006 fixant les modalités du bénéfice des personnes handicapées, de la gratuité du transport et de la réduction de ses tarifs;
  • L’arrêté interministériel no 06 du 8 janvier 2001 portant extension de l’indemnité forfaitaire de solidarité (AFS) aux personnes infirmes, vieillards, incurables et aveugles;
  • L’arrêté interministériel no 01 du 14 février 2009 portant revalorisation du montant de l’allocation forfaitaire de solidarité (AFS).41

Ainsi, en application de ces textes, il est reporté qu’une allocation financière de 4.000 DA/ mois est attribuée à toute personne âgée de plus 18 ans, sans ressources, présentant une invalidité congénitale ou acquise évaluée à 100% entraînant une incapacité totale de travail et une dépendance quasi-totale nécessitant l’aide d’une tierce personne. Au titre de l’exercice 2018, une enveloppe budgétaire d’un montant de 11,764 Milliards DA a été allouée. Ces crédits ont permis à 242.953 personnes handicapées invalides à 100% d’accéder à l’aide consentie. Une allocation forfaitaire de solidarité (AFS) d’un montant de 3000 DA/mois majorée de 120DA/mois par personne à charge dans la limite de trois (3) personnes, est allouée aux personnes handicapées dont le taux d’invalidité est inférieur à 100%. Au titre de l’année 2018, un total de 926.710 personnes étaient bénéficiaires de l’allocation forfaitaire de solidarité (AFS), dont 315.145 personnes âgées.42

11.4 Les personnes handicapées ont-elles un droit de participation à la vie politique (représentation politique et leadership, vote indépendant etc.) de la République d’Algérie?

L’article 5 de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées ratifié par L’Algérie en 2009 consacre le principe de l’égalité et de la non-discrimination. A cet égard, les principes d’égalité devant la loi et de non-discrimination entre tous les citoyens, y compris les personnes handicapées, sont considérés comme des principes fondamentaux de l’Etat algérien. Ainsi, l’article 35 de la constitution sur les droits fondamentaux et les libertés garantis par l’Etat dispose que « Les institutions de la République ont pour finalité d’assurer l’égalité en droits et en devoirs de tous les citoyens et citoyennes en supprimant les obstacles qui entravent l’épanouissement de la personne humaine et empêchent la participation effective de tous à la vie politique, économique, sociale et culturelle. » Cette disposition s’applique également aux citoyens Algériens handicapés et consacre de façon solennelle leurs droit de participation à la vie politique du pays.

11.5 Catégories spécifiques expérimentant des questions particulières/vulnérabilité:
  • Femmes handicapées

En Algérie, les femmes handicapées, souffrent d’une double discrimination basée à la fois sur le sexe et sur le handicap. Ainsi, sur le plan sanitaire par exemple, l’on remarque que la maladie mentale fait que les hôpitaux psychiatriques peuvent être des lieux dangereux pour les femmes. En effet les femmes et les jeunes filles atteintes de handicaps mentaux sont considérablement plus vulnérables aux violences sexuelles. Sur le plan de l’emploi, l’on Remarque également que les femmes handicapées sont davantage exclues du marché du travail que les hommes handicapés et se voient souvent refuser le droit à la maternité et peuvent être confrontées à la stérilisation forcée.43

  • Enfants handicapés

L’on remarque qu’en Algérie, malgré les dispositions légales, la scolarisation des enfants handicapés relève essentiellement de la bonne volonté individuelle d’un directeur d’école ou d’une équipe d’enseignants.44 Dans le même ordre d’idée, en ce qui est de l’enseignement supérieur, l’ensemble des universités algériennes sont difficilement accessibles aux étudiants handicapés. Ceci découle de la non-adaptation du système d’enseignement supérieur aux étudiants pouvant avoir des difficultés, mais aussi à l’absence d’une politique volontariste, portée et soutenue par les responsables du secteur de l’enseignement supérieur préparant aux études supérieures à destination des étudiants handicapés.45 Ensuite, l’impossibilité d’obtenir des aides, telles que les services d’assistance personnelle ou l’aide technique ou humaine constitue un problème supplémentaire lorsqu’une personne souhaite étudier dans une université algérienne.46

12 Perspective future

12.1 Y a-t-il des mesures spécifiques débattues ou prises en compte présentement en Algérie au sujet des personnes handicapées?

Information non disponible

12.2 Quelles réformes légales sont proposées? Quelle réforme légale aimeriez-vous voir en Algérie? Pourquoi?

La modernisation de l’enseignement du Droit des Personnes Handicapées dans les grandes écoles et universités d’Algérie est cruciale. La mise sur pied d’un programme de prise de conscience et de formation des fonctionnaires et autres partie prenantes sur les droits des personnes handicapées devrait être une priorité. Ceci permettrait d’éviter à court et moyens termes les lenteurs administratives et la délivrance rapide des services dédiées à cette catégorie de personnes. Il est temps d’irradier la société algérienne des notions de droit de l’Homme en général et des droits des personnes handicapées en particulier. La mise en pratique de la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux Droits des Personnes Handicapées (CDPH) est plus que nécessaire. Il est aussi important d’activer des textes de lois votés mais qui attendent toujours un décret d’application. Enfin, les masses doivent êtres sensibilisées sur le fait que les personnes handicapées demeurent des personnes à part entière et ne sauraient faire l’objet de quelque discrimination ou stigmatisation que ce soit.

 

 


1. Le recensement de la population sera réalisé en 2021 si la situation sanitaire s’y prête https://www.aps.dz/algerie/tag/Population (consulté le 10 Mars 2021).

3. Mise en œuvre de la résolution 26/20 du Conseil des Droits de l’Homme Contribution de la Commission Nationale Consultative de Promotion et de Protection des Droits de l’Homme (CNCPPDH) − Algérie − https://www.ohchr.org › NHRI › NHRIAlgeriaFRA (consulté le 10 Mars 2021).

4. Personnes aux besoins spécifiques: le nombre effectif sera connu au recensement de 2020 https://www.aps.dz/societe/84152-personnes-aux-besoins-specifiques-le-nombre-effectif-sera-connu-au-recensement-de-2020 (consulté le 20 Mars 2021).

5. Le Comité des droits des personnes handicapées examine le rapport initial de l’Algérie https://www.ohchr.org/fr/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23488&LangID=F (consulté le 10 Mars 2021).

6. Le handicap moteur représente 44 pour cent de l’ensemble des handicaps recensés en Algérie https://www.djazairess.com/fr/lnr/222826 (consulté le 10 Mars 2021).

7. Comme ci-dessus.

8. Il convient néanmoins de souligner que ces dates diffèrent de celles mentionnées dans le rapport initial de l’Algérie qui évoque plutôt le 12 Mai 2009 comme date de ratification par décret présidentiel no 09-188 publié au Journal Officiel de la République d’Algérie en date du 31 Mai 2009.

9. Comité des droits des personnes handicapées. Observations finales concernant le rapport initial de l’Algérie http://docstore.ohchr.org/SelfServices/FilesHandler.ashx?enc=6QkG1d%2FPPRiCAq hKb7yhslha3TVrYYNygQewmXyBJgrT81LIl19YgiqHEadWXK7z4%2BGKuLCw80eCfVp13o83kZRnm9487SAk4PEw7MEVcBsxFf59PYLgkgVihY3PbFk6 (consulté le 24 Avril 2021).

10. L’intégralité des observations et recommandations est disponible sur le lien ci-dessus.

11. Le Comité des droits des personnes handicapées examine le rapport initial de l’Algérie https://www.ohchr.org/fr/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23488&LangID=F (consulté le 24 Avril 2021).

12. Algérie: Cinquième et Sixième rapports périodiques, 2010-2014 https://www.achpr.org/fr_states/statereport?id=100 (consulté le 10 Juillet 2021).

13. Rapport national présenté conformément au paragraphe 5 de l’annexe à la résolution 16/21 du Conseil des droits de l’homme https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G17/037/97/PDF/G1703797.pdf?OpenElement (consulté le 10 Juillet 2021).

14. Le Comité des droits des personnes handicapées examine le rapport initial de l’Algérie https://www.ohchr.org/fr/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23488&LangID=F (consulté le 24 Avril 2021).

15. Le Comité des droits des personnes handicapées examine le rapport initial de l’Algérie https://www.ohchr.org/fr/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23488&LangID=F (Consulté le 24 Avril 2021).

16. Comme ci-dessus.

17. Comme ci-dessus.

18. Réponses Aux Questions Relatives Aux Droits Des Personnes Agées Handicapées https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Disability/OlderPersons/ALGERIA.docx (consulté le 30 Juin 2021).

19. Installation d’une commission nationale d’accessibilité les personnes handicapées à l’environnement https://www.algerie360.com/installation-dune-commission-nationale-daccessi bilite-des-personnes-handicapees-a-lenvironnement/ (consulté le 24 Avril 2021).

20. L’association Nationale de Soutien aux Personnes Handicapées http://elbaraka.e-monsite.com/pages/qui-sommes-nous/missions-devolues-par-l-assemblee-generale.html (consulté le 28 Juin 2021).

21. Comme ci-dessus.

22. FAPH, Pour l’accès aux droits https://faphblog.wordpress.com/qui-sommes-nous/ (consulté le 28 Juin 2021).

23. Mise en œuvre de la résolution 26/20 (n 3).

24. FAPH, Pour l’accès aux droits, https://faphblog.wordpress.com/qui-sommes-nous/ (Consulté le 28 Juin 2021).

25. P Pinto et al ‘Le droit à la protection sociale des personnes handicapées en Algérie’ (2016) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313742307_Le_Droit_a_la_Protection_Sociale_des_Personnes_ Handicapees_en_Algerie (consulté le 30 Juillet 2021).

26. Comme ci-dessus.

27. Comme ci-dessus.

28. Comme ci-dessus.

29. Mise en œuvre de la résolution 26/20 (n 3).

30. Réponses (n 18).

31. Comme ci-dessus.

32. Comme ci-dessus.

33. Comme ci-dessus.

34. Comme ci-dessus.

35. https://education-profiles.org/fr/afrique-du-nord-et-asie-occidentale/algerie/~inclusion#Lois,% 20plans,%20politiques%20et%20programmes (Consulté le 30 Juin 2021).

36. Mise en œuvre de la résolution 26/20 (n 3).

37. Comme ci-dessus.

38. Comme ci-dessus.

39. Réponses (n 18).

40. Pinto (n 25).

41. Réponses (n 18).

42. Comme ci-dessus.

43. Les droits des personnes handicapées en Algérie. https://avocatalgerien.com/laffaire-mecili-une-lettre-de-annie-mecili-au-president-de-la-france/ (consulté le 29 Juillet 2021).

44. Comme ci-dessus.

45. Comme ci-dessus.

46. Comme ci-dessus.

  • Dagnachew B Wakene
  • LLB (Addis Ababa University), MPhil (University of Stellenbosch), LLD candidate (University of Pretoria)
  • Priscilla Yoon
  • BA Public Policy, Leadership and Global Development Studies (University of Virginia)
  • Tsion Mengistu
  • LLB (Addis Ababa University)

  • DB Wakene, P Yoon & T Mengistu ‘Country report: Ethiopia’ (2021) 9 African Disability Rights Yearbook 212-230
  •  http://doi.org/10.29053/2413-7138/2021/v9a10
  • Download article in PDF

 1 Population indicators

1.1 What is the total population of Ethiopia?

The total population of Ethiopia, as per the last Population and Housing Census (PHC) conducted in 2007, was 73 918 505. Of this, 37 296 657 (50.5 per cent) were males and 36 621 848 (49.5 per cent) were females. The population of the country in the previous censuses of 1984 and 1994 was 39 868 572 and 53 477 265, respectively. The 2007 PHC results show that the population of Ethiopia grew at an average annual rate of 2.6 per cent.

According to the World Bank, Ethiopia’s total population in 2019 was 112 078 730, of which 56 069 010 (50.026 per cent) were males and 56 009 720 (49.974 per cent) were females.1

1.2 Describe the methodology used to obtain the statistical data on the prevalence of disability in Ethiopia. What criteria are used to determine who falls within the class of persons with disabilities in Ethiopia?

Censuses are the primary sources of data collection. The 2007 PHC has been done on the following seven thematic areas:

  • Population characteristics;
  • Educational characteristics;
  • Economic activity of the population;
  • Population dynamics/fertility, mortality and migration;
  • Housing and characteristics and living conditions;
  • Disability and orphanhood characteristics; and
  • The situation of women in Ethiopia.

The disability-related section of the Census asked respondents about their disability status, type of disability, and cause(s) of disability.

In the analyses, different methodological approaches such as rates, ratios, percentages, chi square tests, and various kinds of demographic software were used. More advanced statistical techniques were employed for the in-depth analysis.

1.3 What is the total number and percentage of people with disabilities in Ethiopia?

As per the abovementioned PHC data of 2007, there were a total of 1.09 per cent of persons with disabilities in Ethiopia, out of the total population. However, a World Health Organisation and World Bank report published in 2011 estimates that 17.6 per cent of the population in Ethiopia, which is more than 15 million people, live with some form of disability. As per the Ethiopian National Plan of Action on Disability (2011-2021),2 prepared by the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA), the percentage of PWDs indicated by the 2007 Census was widely unaccepted by researchers and disability experts in the country for several reasons, including: the fact that census collectors were not trained with the concept, definitions and rights-based approaches to disability as stipulated in international normative standards; omissions of persons with certain types of disabilities; unwillingness of parents to disclose that they have a child or family member with a disability for fear of societal stigma and prejudice; and exclusion of some geographical areas in surveys due to security reasons.

1.4 What is the total number and percentage of women with disabilities in Ethiopia?

Of the total population counted in the 2007 Census, 805 492 persons or around one per cent of the population were persons with disabilities and there was little variation by sex: 1.15 per cent of males and 1.0 per cent of females had disabilities.

1.5 What is the total number and percentage of children with disabilities in Ethiopia?

There is an acute paucity of disability-focused data in general in Ethiopia, more so when it comes to, inter alia, children and women with disabilities. According to the

Situation and Access to Services of Persons with Disabilities in Addis Ababa - a UNICEF report (2019),3 about 1 per cent of children under the age of 18 in Addis Ababa have a severe disabilities. There is, nonetheless, an evident likelihood that child disability is significantly under-reported.

1.6 What are the most prevalent forms of disability and/or peculiarities to disability in Ethiopia?

Per the 2007 Census, ‘vision problem’ (30.9 per cent) and ‘non-functional upper body’ (27.4 per cent) are the first and second most prevalent forms of disabilities in Ethiopia, respectively.

2 International obligations

2.1 What is the status of the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD) in Ethiopia? Did Ethiopia sign and ratify the CRPD? Provide the date(s).

The Government of Ethiopia signed the Convention on March 2008 and ratified the same in July 2010.

2.2 If Ethiopia has signed and ratified the CRPD, when was its country report due? Which government department is responsible for submission of the report? Did Ethiopia submit its report? If so, and if the report has been considered, indicate if there was a domestic effect of this reporting process. If not, what reasons does the relevant government department give for the delay?

Ethiopia’s initial report to the CRPD Committee was due in 2012 and was submitted in 2013. The report was presented by the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA), the main points were matters relating to implementation of the Convention and disability issues in Ethiopia. The report was also contributed to by different stakeholders from government offices and organisations of persons with disabilities (OPDs).4 Likewise, the second report was submitted in 2016. A list of issues, corroborated by Ethiopia’s replies, and Concluding Observations highlighted by the CRPD Committee in light of Ethiopia’s compliance with the Convention are all available at the Committee’s website.5 A number of nongovernmental organisations also submitted their Shadow Reports during these deliberations. See, inter alia, the Advocates for Human Rights report submitted to the CRPD Committee providing information on Ethiopia’s adherence with the Convention.6

2.3 While reporting under various other United Nation’s instruments, or under the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights, or the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, did Ethiopia also report specifically on the rights of persons with disabilities in its most recent reports? If so, were relevant ‘Concluding Observations’ adopted? If relevant, were these Observations given effect to? Was mention made of disability rights in your state’s UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR)? If so, what was the effect of these Observations/ Recommendations?

In 2014, Ethiopia submitted a periodic country report to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights covering the years 2009 to 2013. The report included information on various measures taken regarding persons with disabilities and ratifications of different international instruments such as the CRPD. The Concluding Observations to this report commended Ethiopia for ratifying various international human rights instruments and establishing institutions to ‘help persons with disabilities’, but also mentioned human rights instruments Ethiopia has not yet ratified and the continued need to protect vulnerable groups including persons with disabilities.

In 2019, Ethiopia submitted its third-cycle national report for the UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR). The report observed measures taken to protect persons with disabilities, human rights awareness, the CRPD, education for children with disabilities, challenges, and more. Conclusions and recommendations regarding disability included the need to further consolidate mainstreaming disability rights in Ethiopia’s national legislation, repealing provisions and articles of the Family Code and Civil Code that condone discrimination based on disability, protecting vulnerable populations and children with disabilities, and more.

2.4 Was there any domestic effect on Ethiopia’s legal system after ratifying the international or regional instruments in 2.3 above? Does the international or regional instrument that has been ratified require Ethiopia’s legislature to incorporate it into the legal system before the instrument can have force in Ethiopia’s domestic law? Have Ethiopia’s courts ever considered this question? If so, cite the case(s).

Under Ethiopian law, ratification of an international human rights treaty means that the latter is part and parcel of the country’s legal framework, having gone through a ratification proclamation by the Federal Parliament. Constitution of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (FDRE Constitution), article 9(4) states, ‘[a]ll international agreements ratified by Ethiopia are an integral part of the law of the land’.

2.5 With reference to 2.4 above, has the United Nation’s CRPD or any other ratified international instrument been domesticated? Provide details.

As mentioned above, under Ethiopian law, ratification of any binding international agreement means incorporation of that specific agreement as the law of the land. The Ethiopian Parliament then issues a ratification proclamation to this effect. For example, the CRPD ratification proclamation is known as ‘Proclamation 676/2010 on the Ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD) by Ethiopia.’7

3 Constitution

3.1 Does the Constitution of Ethiopia contain provisions that directly address disability? If so, list the provisions, and explain how each provision addresses disability.

Yes, the FDRE Constitution, enacted in 1995, includes article 41(5) which sets out the state’s responsibility for the provision of necessary rehabilitation and support services for citizens with disabilities.

Article 41(5) reads:

The State shall, within available means, allocate resources to provide rehabilitation and assistance to the physically and mentally disabled, the aged, and to children who are left without parents or guardian.

No other provision of the Constitution explicitly refers to disability and/or persons with disabilities.

3.2 Does the Constitution of Ethiopia contain provisions that indirectly address disability? If so, list the provisions and explain how each provision indirectly addresses disability.

Article 25 of the Constitution, for example, indirectly addresses disability by stating that:

All persons are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to the equal protection of the law. In this respect, the law shall guarantee to all persons equal and effective protection without discrimination on grounds of race, nation, nationality, or other social origin, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, property, birth or other status.

This provision of equality implies that persons with disabilities are included in equal protection of the law, but tacitly without making an explicit reference to disability and/or persons with disabilities. One third of the Ethiopian Constitution (articles 14-44, of the total 106 articles) dwells on fundamental rights and freedoms, which can validly be presumed to address persons with disabilities as well, but none mention disability expressly except article 41(5) as stated above. An explicit reference to disability in at least the equality and non-discrimination provision is therefore strongly advised, as the constitutional experience of numerous nations.

 

4 Legislation

4.1 Does Ethiopia have legislation that directly addresses issues relating to disability? If so, list the legislation and explain how the legislation addresses disability.
  • Proclamation 1097/2018

Proclamation 1097/2018 of the FDRE determines the power, duties, responsibilities and decision-making orders of the executive organs of the FDRE. Regarding persons with disabilities, article 10/4 (Common Powers of Ministries) states that:

Ministries shall have the power and duties to, in its area of jurisdiction, create, within its powers, conditions whereby persons with disabilities, the elderly, segments of society vulnerable to social and economic problems and HIV AIDS positive citizens benefit from equal opportunities and full participation.

In addition, the Proclamation under article 29 lists the powers and duties of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA) and stipulates that one of the main responsibilities of the Ministry is to ‘enable persons with disabilities benefit from equal opportunities and full participation’ in collaboration with concerned bodies (article 29(11)(a)).

  • The Federal Civil Servant Proclamation 1064/2018

The Federal Civil Servant Proclamation provides for special preference in the recruitment, promotion and deployment of qualified candidates with disabilities. This provision is applicable to government offices only.8

  • The Proclamation concerning the Rights to Employment for Persons with Disabilities 568/2008

This Proclamation, makes null and void any law, practice, custom, attitude and other discriminatory situations that limit equal opportunities for persons with disabilities. It also requires employers to provide appropriate working and training conditions; take all reasonable accommodation measures and affirm active actions, particularly when employing women with disabilities; and assign an assistant to enable a person with disability to perform their work or follow training.9

  • The Labour Proclamation 377/2003

The Labour Proclamation, amended by the Labour Proclamation 494/2006, makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against workers on the basis of nationality, sex, religion, political outlook or on any other conditions.10 Workplace disablements and the duties of employers thereof are also addressed in this proclamation.

  • Proclamation 624/2009

Proclamation 624/2009 (Building Proclamation) contains, in article 36(1) and (2), ‘Facilities for persons with disabilities’. This law provides for accessibility in the design and construction of any building to ensure suitability persons with physical disabilities.11 However, it is recommended that this law be revised to include the multiple accessibility concerns of persons with other types of disabilities, apart from those with physical disabilities.

  • The Ethiopian Electoral, Political Parties Registration and Election’s Code of Conduct Proclamation 1162/2019

Hate Speech and Disinformation Prevention and Suppression Proclamation 1185/2020 defines hate speech as: ‘speech that deliberately promotes hatred, discrimination or attack against a person or a discernible group of identity, based on ethnicity, religion, race, gender or disability’.

  • Directive 41/2015

This Directive allows citizens with disabilities to import one vehicle for personal use, free of all import taxes, every ten years.

  • Proclamation 676/2010

This Proclamation ratified the CRPD in Ethiopia.

  • The Marrakesh Treaty

The Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Otherwise Print Disabled (otherwise abbreviated at ‘VIP’), was ratified by Ethiopia in February 2020.

4.2 Does Ethiopia have legislation that indirectly addresses issues relating to disability? If so, list the main legislation and explain how the legislation relates to disability.

The Regulation on Value Added Tax 79/2002, provides for tax exemptions for equipment to be used by persons with disabilities (see article 24(7)). The same Regulation also exempts ‘workshops for disabled’ from Value Added Tax, on condition that employees with disabilities in such workshops constitute more than 60 per cent of the workforce.

Besides these, social security directives and policies do focus on the protection of vulnerable groups such as children, women, persons with disabilities and elderly, the underemployed and others at risk because of social and natural problems. These directives include various programmes and projects such as, but not limited to, rural and urban productive safety nets, livelihood and employment support, social insurance, access to health, education, and other social services.

5 Decisions of courts and tribunals

5.1 Have the courts (or tribunals) in Ethiopia ever decided on an issue(s) relating to disability? If so, list the cases and provide a summary for each of the cases with the facts, the decision(s) and the reasoning.

There are a number of disability-related civil cases addressed in various chambers of both federal and regional courts of the nation. However, most - if not all - of these cases are inaccessible and not readily available online, except a few decisions passed by the Federal Cassation Court Division - a panel of five to seven judges that looks solely into issues of ‘fundamental errors of law’ and the decisions of which are binding on all lower courts, including courts of regional states.12 In one case, Administration Justice Bureau v Mekonen Teklu (2014), for instance, the plaintiff - a person with visual impairment - invoked Proclamation 568/2008 concerning the employment rights of persons with disabilities wherein the law puts the burden of proof on the employer when a person with disability files suit for a disability-based discrimination in employment. The plaintiff’s claim was that as a prosecutor with visual impairment, he had been discriminated against when his employer cut his pay and transferred him to another position.13 The Cassation Court nonetheless ruled in favour of the defendant, holding that discrimination clauses under Proclamation 568/2008 could not be invoked by public prosecutors and judges whose cases should be entertained by the Public Prosecutors’ Administration Council established pursuant to Regulation 24/2007.14 In critiquing this decision, disability rights lawyers argued that the aforementioned Cassation Court ruling ‘lacks coherence and clarity and is full of contradiction’15 in that:

The Cassation systematically skipped the meaning of ‘government office’, a term which was fundamental to decide on whom the Proclamation (568/2008) is applicable. The calculated crafting of the Proclamation to include all government offices by departing from the Civil Service Legislation should have been given meaning. The Court’s inference of non-justiciability from the provisions of Proc. 568/2008 is without foundation.16

In another milestone case, Wesen Alemu v Training Institute (2017), the defendant declined to appoint the plaintiffs who are qualified lawyers with visual impairments as judges and, instead, hired them as public prosecutors against their will. The defendant’s justification for doing so was the ‘long-established’ practice of not appointing the Blind as judges as the post requires the ability to see witnesses and evidence presented by all parties involved in a lawsuit.17 The plaintiffs then took their case all the way to the House of Federation (which looks into matters related to constitutional interpretation of per article 83 of the FDRE Constitution) claiming violation of their constitutional right to choose their own profession. The House decided that the defendant’s prohibition of the plaintiffs from being appointed as judges was unconstitutional and that articles 41(5), 25 and 9 of the FDRE Constitution had been violated. The decision also stated that there was no convincing evidence submitted by the defendants which proved the appropriateness of the prohibition and that the nature of the work should be evaluated considering reasonable accommodation, referring to the CRPD which is ratified by Ethiopia, as well as Proclamation 568/2008 and the abovementioned relevant clauses of the Constitution.18

6 Policies and programmes

6.1 Does Ethiopia have policies or programmes that directly address disability? If so, list each policy and explain how the policy addresses disability
  • Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP)

The Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP) 2010-2015, establishes disability as a cross cutting sector of development where focus is given to preventing disability and to providing education and training, rehabilitation and equal access and opportunities to persons with disabilities.19

  • The Ten-Year Perspective Development Plan

This Plan builds off of its predecessor, the GTP, and addresses disability as a crosscutting theme of development, although it seems to have essentially adopted an approach whereby persons with disabilities are considered recipients of support/assistance rather than active and notable contributors themselves to their country’s development endeavours.

  • The National Plan of Action of Persons with Disabilities

The National Plan of Action of Persons with Disabilities (2012-2021) aims at making Ethiopia an inclusive society. It addresses the needs of persons with disabilities in Ethiopia for comprehensive rehabilitation services, equal opportunities for education, skills training and work, as well as full participation in the life of their families, communities and the nation.20

  • Framework Document 2009

This Document provides for ‘Special Needs Education (SNE)’ in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET).21

6.2 Does Ethiopia have policies and programmes that indirectly address disability? If so, list each policy and describe how the policy indirectly addresses disability.
  • The National Social Protection Policy of Ethiopia (2012)

This Policy is a document developed by the Government of Ethiopia to protect citizens from economic and social deprivation. It mainly focuses on the following objectives: protect poor and vulnerable individuals, households, and communities from the adverse effects of shocks and destitution; increase the scope of social insurance; increase access to equitable and quality health, education and social welfare services to build human capital thus breaking the inter-generational transmission of poverty; guarantee a minimum level of employment for the long term unemployed and underemployed; enhance the social status and progressively realise the social and economic rights of the excluded and marginalised; and ensure the different levels of society are taking appropriate responsibility for the implementation of social protection.22

7 Disability bodies

7.1 Other than the ordinary courts and tribunals, does Ethiopia have any official body that specifically addresses violations of the rights of people with disabilities? If so, describe the body, its functions and its powers.

In recent years, following reforms that ensued as of 2018, a ‘Disability Directorate’ has been established within auspices of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA).

Moreover, the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission - an independent national human rights institution answerable to the Parliament - has, for the first time, set up a Deputy Commissioner’s position focused on disability and the elderly in 2021, for which a woman with disability is appointed as Deputy Commissioner.

7.2 Other than the ordinary courts or tribunals, does Ethiopia have any official body that though not established to specifically address violations of the rights of persons with disabilities, can nonetheless do so? If so, describe the body, its functions and its powers.

The Ombudsman, primarily mandated to address issues of maladministration, could be considered an extension of the desire and endeavours to establish independent human rights institutions in Ethiopia. It contributes to rectifying rights’ violations by addressing matters of maladministration against, inter alia, persons with disabilities and promotes good governance in any public institution.

8 National human rights institutions

8.1 Does Ethiopia have a Human Rights Commission or an Ombudsman or Public Protector? If so, does its remit include the promotion and protection of the rights of people with disabilities? If your answer is yes, also indicate whether the Human Rights Commission, Ombudsman or Public Protector of Ethiopia has ever addressed issues relating to the rights of persons with disabilities.

Yes, as elucidated above, the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission and the Ethiopian Institution of the Ombudsman are both actively engaged in advising on and monitoring issues related to persons with disabilities.

9 Disabled peoples organisations (DPOs) and other civil society organisations

9.1 Does Ethiopia have organisations that represent and advocate for the rights and welfare of persons with disabilities? If so, list each organisation and describe its activities.

Persons with disabilities have formed six national and specific disability-focused associations under the umbrella of a Federation of Ethiopian Associations of Persons with Disabilities (FEAPD). These are:

  • Federation of Ethiopian Associations of Persons with Disabilities (FEAPD);
  • Ethiopian National Association of the Blind (ENAB);
  • Ethiopian National Association of Persons with Physical Disabilities (ENAPPD);
  • Ethiopian National Association of the Deaf (ENAD);
  • Ethiopian National Association of the Deaf-Blind (ENDB);
  • Ethiopian National Association of Persons Affected by Leprosy (ENAPAL);
  • Ethiopian National Association on Intellectual Disability (ENAID); and
  • And regional branches of the above OPDs.

All associations are working on the rights and welfares of their members. They also participate in development activities.23

FEAPD has, since 2020, amended its by-laws to accept as full members those organisations of persons with disabilities (OPDs) whose constituencies may have various types of disabilities, other than the single-disability focused organisations.

9.2 Are DPOs organised/coordinated at a national and/or regional level?

Yes, OPDs are organised and coordinated both at federal and regional levels. OPDs in some regions, including the Capital Addis Ababa, have also organised themselves at the ‘woreda’ (structure lower than regions and sub-cities) level.

9.3 If Ethiopia has ratified the CRPD, how has it ensured the involvement of DPOs in the implementation process?

OPDs participated in the evaluation/monitoring and production of Shadow Reports to the CRPD Committee, and in reports during Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) of Ethiopia concerning implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), among others. Nevertheless, there is still a major lack of direct representation of persons with disabilities in the legislative, executive and judiciary branches of government.

9.4 What types of actions have DPOs themselves taken to ensure that they are fully embedded in the process of implementation?

Involvement of organisations of persons with disabilities (OPDs) in decision-making processes in Ethiopia has generally been minimal and mostly visible during commemorations of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, IDPD, on 3 December . This, however, seems to be changing over the past few years as OPDs are taking part in the formulation of some policies, notably the National Plan of Action on Disability (2011-2021). Moreover, there are numerous instances of partnership projects between local OPDs and international organisations advocating for the rights of persons with disabilities. For instance, an International Labour Organisation (ILO) technical cooperation project, ‘Promoting Rights and Opportunities of Persons with Disabilities in Employment through Legislation’ (PROPEL), aims at capacitating the Ethiopian government, social partners, and disability advocates to be actively engaged in the implementation of ILO C15924 and the CRPD. It also enables them to share the Ethiopian experiences in disability rights legislation, inclusion and CRPD implementation with other African countries is an example of good practice of the process of moving towards a disability-inclusive society. Starting with a systematic examination of laws in place to promote employment and training opportunities for people with disabilities in the selected countries of each region, the project sets out to examine the operation of such legislation, identify and strengthen the implementation mechanisms in place and suggest further improvements.25 All in all, nevertheless, there are still limited interventions by OPDs in mainstream policies, legislative processes and decisions as also pointed out by the CRPD Committee in one of its main Concluding Observations on Ethiopia’s compliance of the Convention which reads:

The Committee is further concerned that persons with disabilities and their representative organizations [in Ethiopia] are not systematically consulted in the development of all policies and laws, training and awareness-raising across all sectors.26

9.5 What, if any, are the barriers DPOs have faced in engaging with implementation?

The principal barrier that OPDs face is systemic/structural exclusion. While OPDs are engaged in the implementation of policies, treaties, proclamations and other directives directly related to disability, they often do not engage with directives that indirectly affect PWDs. For example, despite the fact that poverty is a pivotal issue disproportionately affecting citizens with disabilities in Ethiopia, OPDs were not involved in many of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Processes (PRSPs) until recent years. The country’s PRSP documents adopted since 1995 through 2010 did not make any reference to disability and PWDs. It was only in 2010, with the advent of the third PRSP document, known as the Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP), that disability was, for the first time, mentioned in a section talking about ‘social welfare’. The exclusion of OPDs and the experiences of PWDs from mainstream policy, legislation, and decision-making processes is detrimental and counterproductive. OPDs must, for multiple reasons, be engaged in the implementation of human rights instruments on a broader level than solely on matters relating directly to disability.

9.6 Are there specific instances that provide ‘best-practice models’ for ensuring proper involvement of DPOs?

It is anticipated that there will be a census in Ethiopia soon. Organisations of persons with disabilities (OPDs), including the Federation of Ethiopian Associations of Persons with Disabilities (FEAPD), CSOs, NGOs and INGOs that are working in the disability area have meticulously discussed, with the Central Statistics Agency (CSA), incorporating the Washington Group Sets of Questions (WGSQ) in the next census. FEAPD took a lead and provided training for CSA staff on disability and WGSQ. Albeit this census has yet to take place, the inclusive and multipartite collaborative process thus far adopted by OPDs, CSOs and the government in order to ensure that disability is well captured in the data collection tools can be mentioned as a best-practice model in its own right.

Furthermore, the recently held General Election of Ethiopia 2021, unlike the preceding elections, has seen an unprecedented participation of citizens with disabilities. For the first time in Ethiopia’s election history, disability inclusion was debated by political parties as a core theme and this was televised by major broadcasters. According to the National Electoral Board of Ethiopia (NEBE), a record number of 99 candidates with disabilities have run for both Federal and regional parliaments, of which 76 have won seats. Nevertheless, systemic impediments such as, but not limited to, pervasive inaccessibility of polling stations; communication barriers (particularly for persons with hearing impairments); and stereotypes and misconceptions observed within the leadership of some parties about the active involvement of citizens with disabilities as candidates and voters, were among the continued challenges seen in this year’s elections.

9.7 Are there any specific outcomes regarding successful implementation and/or improved recognition of the rights of persons with disabilities that resulted from the engagement of DPOs in the implementation process?

After Ethiopia ratified the CRPD, the regional state of South Nations, Nationalities and Peoples (SNNPR) created a task force to monitor the implementation of the CRPD within its jurisdiction. This task force was comprised of 14 sector offices and six OPDs.27 The presence of OPDs in such task forces allows for successful monitoring and appropriate responses to the implementation of the CRPD. In Ethiopia, many OPDs and the FEAPD have also been included in the national monitoring committees. Consequently, OPDs were quite involved in the creation of the country’s report to the CRPD Committee.

9.8 Has your research shown areas for capacity building and support (particularly in relation to research) for DPOs with respect to their engagement with the implementation process?

Yes, there is a need for OPDs to be mainstreamed into the general legislation, policy-making, and decision-making processes regardless of whether the issue at hand is directly about disability. Ethiopia also has an acute need for adequate data collection and research, including a census, on disability. There is a lack of specific research institutes that work on disability rights or work with OPDs. Further data collection and research will be beneficial for the government, OPDs, and other groups when preparing reports, creating appropriate policies, and addressing the specific needs of PWDs in Ethiopia.

9.9 Are there recommendations that come out of your research as to how DPOs might be more comprehensively empowered to take a leading role in the implementation processes of international or regional instruments?

The critical question seems to be less of whether or not OPDs have the capacity to take a leading role in implementation processes, but more of whether or not the government and other authority figures acknowledge the need for OPDs in these processes and actively engage with them in order to understand why OPDs are needed in those leadership roles. Changing perceptions of disability within Ethiopia would empower OPDs to further disability rights and advocacy in the country as well.

9.10 Are there specific research institutes in Ethiopia that work on the rights of persons with disabilities and that have facilitated the involvement of DPOs in the process, including in research?

There are no specific research institutes that work on the rights of person with disabilities or facilitate the involvement of OPDs, but the Federation of Ethiopian Associations of Persons with Disabilities (FEAPD) and other organisations that are working in the disability arena try to do research, albeit not so comprehensive oftentimes, on the issues of disability and persons with disabilities. The Addis Ababa University’s Special Needs Education Department also engages in such research.

10 Government departments

10.1 Does Ethiopia have a government department or departments that is/are specifically responsible for promoting and protecting the rights and welfare of persons with disabilities? If so, describe the activities of the department(s).

Yes. At the federal level, the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA) is the main governmental organ responsible for the provision of social and vocational rehabilitation of people with disabilities. Operating within MoLSA is the Disability Directorate which coordinates disability issues at the federal level as part of its wider mandate to deal with employment and social issues. In the 11 regional states in Ethiopia, there are regional Bureaus for Labour and Social Affairs (BoLSAs). BoLSAs handle all social matters, including disability-related issues, under the policy framework established by MoLSA. Other ministries are expected to take responsibility for mainstreaming disability into their respective areas of work as stated under Proclamation 1097/2018 on ‘Definitions of Power of the Executive Organs of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia’.

11 Main human rights concerns of people with disabilities

11.1 Contemporary challenges of persons with disabilities in Ethiopia (for example, in some parts of Africa ritual killing of certain classes of PWDs, such as people with albinism, occurs).

Discrimination against and mistreatment of persons with disabilities is severe and pervasive in Ethiopia. Children with disabilities are especially vulnerable to abuse; they are often abandoned by one or both parents and, in more remote areas of the country, sometimes exposed to infanticide. Children with disabilities suffer from exploitation and sexual abuse at much higher rates than do their peers. Even when children report abuse, their parents, teachers, and health workers often choose to not take legal action against the abuser. Beyond physical harm, children with disabilities are often denied their right to an education in part due to the belief that they are unable to learn. The government does little to provide for students with disabilities and teachers are often unwilling and untrained to accommodate the students.

The abuse and discrimination experienced by children with disabilities follows them into adulthood. Persons with disabilities have difficulty finding work as they are not protected under Ethiopia's Labour Proclamation. The legislation does not require employers to provide reasonable accommodation for employees with disabilities and allows employers to use a disability as grounds for termination. Some people with disabilities also have difficulty accessing health care as little is done to communicate services and resources to people with sensory disabilities. In the absence of a strong support system, it is often difficult for them to communicate their concerns to their doctors and to have their feelings be understood.

In Ethiopia, the charity approach to disability still prevails, and there is a general tendency to think of persons with disabilities as weak, hopeless and dependent on the goodwill of others.28 Due to this stigma combined with low accessibility and few economic resources, the great majority of persons with disabilities do not have access to basic health, education, and social services that could help reduce their dependency and facilitate their independent living with a sustainable livelihood.29

11.2 Describe the contemporary challenges of persons with disabilities and the legal responses thereto, and assess the adequacy of these responses to:
  • Ableism, societal ignorance, prejudice and stereotypes;
  • Accessibility and reasonable accommodation;
  • Access to social security;
  • Access to public buildings;
  • Access to public transport;
  • Access to education;
  • Access to vocational training;
  • Access to employment;
  • Access to recreation and sport; and
  • Access to justice.

Despite the availability of different policies and legislations on rights of PWDs, the reality of PWDs is far from the legislation or policies. PWDS still live under the shadow without any access to public services including education, health and transportation.

Poverty also intersects with disability as it is both the cause and consequence of disability. An estimated 95 per cent of all persons with disabilities in the country are living in poverty. Additionally, 84 per cent of the population in Ethiopia live in rural areas so it is like PWDS are also living in rural areas, where access to services are limited and often inaccessible to PWDs. In order to address the needs of the poor, the FDRE has created a Plan for Accelerated and Sustainable Development to End Poverty (PASDEP). This plan, however, did not directly address the needs of PWDs or their families.30

11.3 Do people with disabilities have a right to participation in political life (political representation and leadership) in Ethiopia?

Yes. They have the right to participate. However, unlike the constitutions of several African countries and elsewhere, there is neither a constitutional provision nor other laws stipulating parliamentary representation of PWDs in Ethiopia.

11.4 Are people with disabilities’ socio-economic rights, including the right to health, education and other social services protected and realised in Ethiopia?

A 2016 report by The Advocates for Human Rights on Ethiopia’s compliance with the CRPD noted the problem that Ethiopians with disabilities do not have non-discriminatory access to healthcare. Access to healthcare, proper communication, and training of medical staff are inadequate to address the needs of persons with disabilities. Persons with disabilities also face healthcare discrimination based on political opinion due to kebele (the lowest administrative organ in Ethiopia) officials who can deny services such as referral notes for secondary healthcare in hospitals.

11.5 Specific categories experiencing particular issues/vulnerability.
  • Women with disabilities

Female genital mutilation is still practiced in Ethiopia. According to the 2016 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), 65 per cent of women in the age group between 15 and 49 years are circumcised and the prevalence of female genital mutilation and circumcision increases with age.31 There are inadequate legal consequences, arrests, research, and data collection on this phenomenon that continues to harm women and children.

Women and girls with disabilities also face gender-based violence and sexual abuse. Girls with disabilities are more likely to suffer physical and sexual abuse than girls without disabilities and 33 per cent of girls with disabilities who have sexual experience report having experienced forced sex.32 Women and girls with disabilities experience multiple discrimination based on their disability and gender.

  • Children with disabilities

Children with disabilities face extreme forms of violence, stigma and discrimination, primarily due to misconceptions rooted in cultural beliefs and traditions. Children with disabilities are twice as likely to become victims of violence than their able-bodied peers; fewer than ten per cent of children with disabilities in Africa receive any form of education and only two per cent attend school.33 There is also a need to make education inclusive for children with disabilities.

12 Future perspective

12.1 Are there any specific measures with regard to persons with disabilities being debated or considered in Ethiopia at the moment?

Yes, there is ongoing deliberation on issuing a comprehensive Disability Act in Ethiopia. A drafting process of this Act is already underway, involving experts with disabilities and OPDs. It is hoped that this legislative piece will serve as a ‘one-stop-shop’ of all disability-specific laws available in Ethiopia.

12.2 What legal reforms are being raised? Which legal reforms would you like to see in Ethiopia? Why?

The 2016 report by The Advocates for Human Rights on Ethiopia’s compliance with the CRPD highlighted several problems with Ethiopia’s obligations under the CRPD. One of the issues raised was concerns that the 2009 Charities and Societies Proclamation (CSP) constrained civil society in Ethiopia as this law practically disallows receiving funds from international donors for human rights-related activities in the country. The report pointed out how the CSP negatively affects NGOs and domestic associations, including OPDs such as disability-related associations under the FEAPD. It has been recommended that the Ethiopian government repeal the CSP which, as of 2019, is repealed and replaced by Proclamation 1113/2019 that retracted the restrictive clauses in the previous law.

The fact that Ethiopia’s current Constitution makes no mention whatsoever of persons with disabilities except under the section dealing with economic and social rights is another major lacuna. Disability should be expressly incorporated at least as a prohibited ground of discrimination in the equality and non-discrimination provisions of the Constitution, as is the case in several African countries. A constitutional clause consolidates the justiciability of disability rights.

To this end therefore, based on our readings, views and practical expertise in the Ethiopian disability sector, the following salient reforms are of paramount urgency:

  • Incorporation of a disability-specific substantive provision in the FDRE Constitution that ensures constitutional guarantees on disability rights, as is currently the case with women’s rights (article 35) and the rights of children (article 36), for instance;
  • Revision of article 25 of the FDRE Constitution so that it explicitly includes disability among other statuses against which discrimination is prohibited;
  • Revision of article 54 of the FDRE Constitution so that political representation of citizens with disabilities in the House of Peoples’ Representatives would be realised;
  • Prepare and adopt comprehensive, stronger and effective disability law that contains details of disability rights, anti-disability discrimination provisions, enforcement mechanisms and institutional set ups mandated to ensure the full implementation of that law;
  • Systematically and visibly incorporate disability in all mainstream laws that affect the lives of citizens with disabilities such as health law, education law, and other legislations that are in the pipeline to be promulgated and/or are already in force;
  • Undertake research, in consultation with organisations of citizens with disabilities, and plan for disability budgeting;
  • Set in place a system upon which each ministry and governmental organ equally plans and allocates budget for disability;
  • Adopt the federal government budget proclamation by incorporating a disability-inclusive fiscal planning and budget allocation;
  • Carry out national campaigns for accessibility of public and private service providers so that buildings, streets, pavements, communications, etc. will comply with minimum accessibility standards;
  • Ensure that accessibility standards consider all types of disabilities such as visual cues for the deaf, tactile and braille signs and so on;
  • Establish disability specific transport services; and
  • Issue accessibility standards for public information.

Finally, the importance of having up-to-date statistics and data on disability to inform policies and implement the CRPD is not debatable, as clearly stipulated under article 31(1) of the CRPD. It follows that one of the state’s obligations under the CRPD is to collect appropriate, disability-disaggregated information, statistics and data. It is indicated earlier in this report that the 2007 National Census was not sternly criticised by disability experts in Ethiopia for its inadequacy in capturing the number of persons with disabilities owing to various factors. Some of these factors included failure to adopt an appropriate definition of the term disability and failure to incorporate appropriate questions that are helpful to identify persons with disabilities in survey questionnaires. The various ministries and sectors also do not have a system of gathering disability data in provision of their services. The Ministry of Education incorporates disability data in its annual abstract which is the best experience for others. Other sectors do not have such practices. In this regard therefore, we recommend:

  • Incorporation of the CRPD definition of the term ‘persons with disabilities’ and formulation of census survey questionnaires in line with international standards; and
  • Creating a uniform system upon which various sectors keep disability data in their service deliveries.

 


1. World Bank ‘Population, total: Ethiopia’ (2019) https://data.worldbank.org/indica tor/SP.POP.TOTL? locations=ET (accessed 27 May 2021).

2. Ethiopian Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA) ‘National plan of action of persons with disabilities (2012-2021)’ April 2012, Addis Ababa, at 2 https://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/ELECTRONIC/94528/110953/F-1258023553/ETH9 4528.pdf (accessed 27 May 2021).

3. UNICEF Ethiopia & MOLSA ‘Ethiopia: Situation and access to services of people with disabilities and homeless people in two sub-cities of Addis Ababa’ (2019) https://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/Best%20of%20UNICEF%20Research%202019. pdf (accessed 27 May 2021).

4. Consideration of reports submitted by states parties under article 35 of the Convention, 19 March 2015.

5. See Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Sixteenth Session, List of issues in relation to the initial report of Ethiopia Addendum: Replies of Ethiopia to the list of issues (8 August 2016) UN Doc CRPD/C/ETH/Q/1/Add.1 (2016); Concluding Observations on the Initial Report of Ethiopia, Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (4 November 2016) UN Doc CRPD/C/ETH/CO/1 (2016) para 7 https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx? symbolno=CRPD/C/ETH/CO/1&Lang=En (accessed 27 May 2021).

6. Advocates for Human Rights ‘Ethiopia’s compliance with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Shadow report Submitted to the 16th Session of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 15 August-2 September 2016’ https://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/uploads/ethiopian_-_crpd_-_july_2016 .pdf (accessed 4 November 2016).

7. See https://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/ELECTRONIC/109313/135559/F-12193 01009/ ETH109313.pdf.

8. International Labour Organization ‘Inclusion of people with disabilities in Ethiopia: Fact sheet’ (January 2013).

9. As above.

10. As above.

11. As above.

12. Art 2(1) of the Federal Courts Proclamation Reamendment Proclamation 454/2005.

13. Administration Justice Bureau v Mekonen Teklu (file 75034) Cassation Decision, vol 14 (Sept 2014).

14. As above.

15. A Wesen ‘The right to be employed: The case of visually impaired persons in Ethiopia’ Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of Master of Laws Degree (LLM) in Human Rights Law, Addis Ababa University, School of Graduate Studies, College of Law and Governance, 2019 at105.

16. As above.

17. Wesen Alemu v Amhara National Regional State Justice Professionals’ Training and Legal Research Institute (File 019/08, House of Federation, 12 October 2017).

18. As above.

19. ILO (n 8).

20. As above.

21. As above.

22. Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs ‘National social protection policy of Ethiopia’ (26 March 2012) http://extwprlegs1.fao.org/docs/pdf/eth189010.pdf (accessed 27 May 2021).

23. ILO (n 8).

24. ILO, C159: Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (Disabled Persons) Convention, 1983.

25. As above.

26. Concluding Observations on the Initial Report of Ethiopia (n 5).

27. Ethiopian Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (n 2) 2.

28. T Teferra Disability in Ethiopia: Issues, insights, and implications (2005).

29. MOLSA (n 2).

30. ILO (n 8).

31. Austrian Centre for Country of Origin & Asylum Research and Documentation ‘Ethiopia: COI Compilation’ (November 2019).

32. Advocates for Human Rights (n 6).

33. ACPF ‘The African Report on Child Wellbeing 2018: Progress in the child-friendliness of African governments’ (2018).

Open Access Policy

The African Disability Rights Yearbook is an Open Access Journal and provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. In accordance with the definition of the Budapest Open Access Initiative all content published by the African Disability Rights Yearbook is made free to users without any registration, subscription or other charges. Users are permitted to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full text of these articles, or use them for any other lawful, non-commercial purpose, without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author.